Aug 082007
 

Hey Matt,

I haven’t been up here in ages, but recent developments force my reappearance. During the last week, I did nothing but scrape and paint the baseboards in my house. It was pleasing work because it was the first time I really listened to music for quite some time. For the most part, I listened to nothing but a tape I made in high school that paired Squeeze‘s East Side Story with Costello‘s Trust. Talk about a one-two punch! I forgot how great both of those slabs of wax were! I definitely see the two records as companion pieces. Costello’s production gives Squeeze more of an edge, and Squeeze’s influence, I’d like to believe, put a bit of a fire under Costello’s hiney. Both LPs are loaded with winners. On the Squeeze LP, I find no stinkers, and the Costello LP only has one: “Shot with His Own Gun”.

Don’t know about you, but I’d take Trust over Imperial Bedroom any day of the week. How about you? And pushing that further, which record, in your estimation, is better, Trust or East Side Story?

(Maybe you were lucky enough to catch Costello and Squeeze on their double-header tour when both were promoting the above records. If so, I envy you. I had to settle for a Squeeze performance at Gettysburg College. Costello couldn’t make the show. Flock of Seagulls took his place. Whatever. I was in high school, it was my first concert, and the whole thing was entertaining as hell. Squeeze was dynamite. They played nearly every song from East Side Story, and all of it sounded exactly like the record! I prefer that take over doing a “Jazz Odyssey” workout on well-known numbers. Those who appreciated what Costello did to his gems during his “Goodbye Cruel World” tour definitely have more adventurous appetities than myself.)

After I finished the baseboards, I scrambled over to my brother-in-law’s house to borrow some more Squeeze LPs: Argybargy and Sweets from a Stranger. Both had a gem or two, but for the most part, they were pretty bad. Too much nonsense about tea, biscuits, and the bath swaddled in rhythms and melodies that went nowhere. What happened? No Costello! No wonderboy who also produced the first Specials LP. No whizz kid who had that “everything I touch turns to gold Beatles Magic” that lasted until he started working on Imperial Bedroom.

Having a producer who’s brave enough to kick ass when egos get out of control is vitally important. There’s an endless list of artists who began to suck immediately when their egos decided their producer wasn’t necessary anymore. Why Squeeze ditched Costello and Costello ditched Nick Lowe will continue to be two of the greatest mysteries of life.

Anyway, get back to me ASAP with your thoughts on all this nonsense. And by the way, thanks for that Three O’Clock download.

Sincerely.
E. Pluribus Gergeley

PS. If you have MP3s of “Real World” by the Buzzcocks and “Tell Me When My Light Turns Green” by Dexy’s send ’em my way. I’m dying to hear those tracks again!

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  55 Responses to “Attn Berlyant: East Side Story Vs. Trust”

  1. Mr. Moderator

    My man, good to hear from you! Before I get into your post, what’s up with you still needing the Buzzcocks and Dexy’s tracks? I’ve made you 2 copies of the same mix CD with those tracks. I can understand you losing the cassette from 15 years ago. I think you need to get an iPod to store your tracks. I’ll get you those tracks in the next few days, if not sooner. If you get them from someone else around here they’re likely to be taken from some Bill Inglot remastered CD edition. I’ll burn you the stuff from vinyl, with all the necessary pops, scratches, and fingerprint grease.

    Onto your post… These are two excellent albums. Because East Side Story is so much better than any other album Squeeze would ever release, it’s got to get the nod over Trust. There is a second turd on that album, by the way, “Luxemborg”. Not even Bruce Thomas’ bass part could save that bad boy. I know you disagree, but I can see why you and Andyr like “She’s a Woman”.

    Finally, I’ll take Imperial Bedroom over Trust. The lyrics on Imperial Bedroom, especially on the excellent side 2, are among the only Costello lyrics that mean anything to me. I like his throwaway lines as much as the next fan, but he rarely puts together an entire set of lyrics that move me. Most exceptions are found on IB. Furthermore, IB gets the nod because it’s a great “side 2 album.” I love albums that build and get better through side 2. Trust is a great “side 1 album,” even with “Luxemborg”, but side 2 comes to a crashing halt during “Shot With His Own Gun”. It’s not until “Big Sister’s Clothes” that I can get the bad taste of “Shot…” out of my mouth.

  2. Jim said:

    I know you disagree, but I can see why you and Andyr like “She’s a Woman”.

    Woah, Hold on there, Homes. Why darg me into this. For the record – I know you know that I DESPISE “She’s A Woman”. I don’t want my name linked with that turd at all.

    Please strike that from the coments, Mr Mod or their will be hell to pay tonight when we record!

  3. I do agree with EPB (and Mr Mod) that “East Side Story” is great.

    “In Quintessence” is a awesome album opener. Besides the much better production than other Squeeze LP’s (what’s worse than Gilsen Lavis’s early drum sound, this album actually has well executed variety.

    I think I give “Trust” the slightest edge over “Imperial Bedroom”. “Trust” has aged much better for me than “IB”. The first side of “Trust” is perfect (even w/ Luxenburg). In my book, “IB” has just as many songls like “Shot w/ His Own Gun” (see “Boy With a Problem”)

    “Trust” leans back towards his best period while “IB” hints at his downfall

  4. Hey Andy,

    Just for the record, and I’ve said this over and over again, “She’s a Woman” is a rhythmic masterpiece. It features a rhythmic thrust that can only be achieved through studio manipulation. Next time we’re all together, I’m gonna bring over the Capitol records mono version of that take, with the extra reverb, to show what I’ve been going on and on about for the last 25 years or so. And it’s not just me either. Read the analysis of the track in “Revolution in the Head”. Get your head out of that song’s lyrical hiny (And I’m surprised the lyrics bother the Moderator so much because, in his words, he doesn’t listen to lyrics anyway). Focus on the bass, hit hat, snare, guitar, and piano. The interworkings of those instruments on the track is clever as hell.

    Sincerely,
    E. Pluribus

  5. E. Pluribus

    It’s not so much the lyrics that suck, but i really dislike Paul’s vocals on it too. The blackface voice doesn’t cut it on this track. I also don’t like George’s part.

    Yes, the drums are cool. In fact I copped the drums for one of our new songs.

  6. Mr. Moderator

    EPG,

    I hear the words right away when they suck as bad as those in “She’s a Woman”! Coupled with McCartney’s Sammy Davis Jr. style of singing (ie, adding “sh” sounds to words that don’t even contain said letters), I’m sorry, but the big beat and “studio manipulation” (ooh, there’s a fancy concept!) may be ripe for picking, but man, they don’t get my mind off all that sucks about that song.

    A-Dogg, I will welcome you to our studio session tonight.

  7. hrrundivbakshi

    Hey, Plurbs — how exactly did this turn into a discussion about the Beatles?

    Your pal,

    HVB

  8. Mr. Moderator

    Hey Hrrundi,

    On behalf of my man, Plurbs, I challenge you to respond to the man’s post, even if it means comparing the Squeeze and Costello albums in question to the works of the Holy Trinity of ZZ Top, ELO, and Prince!

  9. hrrundivbakshi

    I can’t believe you chose that “Is That Love?” turd to illustrate the wonderfulness of “ESS.” Talk about a song that crystallizes all that’s WRONG about the cringe-worthy “power pop” sub-category. Pointless chord changes, minor-to-major resolutions (ooh! Listen to how Beatles-y we sound!) and a melody best enjoyed while drinking maraschino cherry syrup out of a sippy cup… eccchh.

    And the Kramer bass doesn’t help matters.

  10. Mr. Moderator

    And by the way, Hrrundi, I don’t mean to diminish your apt criticism of EPG. While we’re at it, do you like the way Andyr quickly tried to turn the discussion into a forum on his self-appointed brilliance as a drum arranger?

    Getting back to the topic at hand, has anyone ever read anything on what pixie dust Costello might have sprinkled on Squeeze to allow them to record one album that actually sounds like it was made by a real, live swinging band? Even their handful of good singles from all the other albums sound stiffer than the 24-hour rod sported by Plurbie’s romantacized 19-year-old rock ‘n roller.

  11. hrrundivbakshi

    Mod said:

    Even their handful of good singles from all the other albums sound stiffer than the 24-hour rod sported by Plurbie’s romantacized 19-year-old rock ‘n roller.

    I say:

    Moddie, that’s the first time RTH has made me laugh out loud in *weeks*. Well done!

  12. Mr. Moderator

    Nice on-topic comeback, Hrrundi! I, too, wondered why this performance was chosen (by the way, as a live performance, how does it stack up against your favorite performance of The Who’s “Join Together”?); in fact, I was thinking it was an Argybargy song. I like the song, however, and it’s probably one of the only YouTubeable tracks from that album. Cut the brother a break, and answer the question: How great is this album despite all that you feel is wrong with that one song?

  13. hrrundivbakshi

    Before it starts to seem like I’m picking on my main man Plurbs, let it be known that he’s *right on* as far as the “Trust” vs. “Imperial Bedroom” debate is concerned. As I think I’ve said before, “Trust” just keeps getting better with age, while the same cannot be said for “IB,” at least for me.

    Most of what Squeeze delivered was lightweight, frothy nonsense. “East Side Story” was different.

  14. And you wonder why I don’t post as much Mr Mod. I’m constantly being subtely dissed by you.

    Do we have issues that need to be discussed? Do we need to ge the dude from the Metalica documentary to facilitate?

    Just don’t give me any shit tonight or I’ll spend the session sitting in the lounge. You can get ChickenFrank to do the dirty work.

    Thanks for amending the comments though

  15. Hey Moderator,

    Re: She’s a Woman. It’s a rhythm thing. You wouldn’t understand.

    Sincerely,
    E. Pluribus

  16. Mr. Moderator

    Plurbie,

    You have got to do better than that!

  17. Re: the clip.

    Hrundi, my brother, you and I have done some real power bonding during the last couple of weeks. You know what I’m talking about. You should know me better. I agree the Squeeze clip is indeed weak, but it’s the only one I could find that was actually a track off the LP.

    Cut me a break before you start kicking me in the nuts.

    Sincerely,
    E. Pluribus.

    P.S. Moderator, I reiterate. It’s a rhythm thing. You wouldn’t understand. Anything beyond a 4/4 stomp becomes rocket science to your ears and feet.

  18. hrrundivbakshi

    Plurbie says:

    Anything beyond a 4/4 stomp becomes rocket science to your ears and feet.

    I say:

    I dunno if it’s true, but it sure is funny. Winner!

  19. I don’t even know where to begin with this one. Since I’ve been summoned, I feel the need to respond. Buckle your seat belts because this will be a long ride.

    As for choosing between Trust and Imperial Bedroom, I love all of EC’s albums between 1977 and 1982 so much that not only do I think that this period rivals any great one in rock and roll, ever, but it’s like asking me to choose between children. I think both are perfect and have no bad songs (though of course I like some better than others), but the two albums are very different from each other.

    I think Trust has aged better than Imperial Bedroom for some because it was considered a disappointment when it came out, both to fans and critics alike. Let’s consider the circumstances here. It was a commercial flop and contained a few songs that EC had in the vault for years (including “New Lace Sleeves” and “Different Finger”, which date back to 1975 and 1973). EC was clearly not on his “A-game” here. Despite all of this, the album works (to say the least). It works for me because it’s the most eclectic of his 1st 5. There’s country (“Different Finger”), a piano ballad which I love though everyone else on here seems to hate (“Shot with His Own Gun”) and several rhythmic exercises (“Lovers Walk” and “Strict Time”) in addition to some straight-up rockabilly with slurred lyrics (“Luxembourg”). You know what, though? I love all of it.

    It’s not EC’s strongest set of songs, but it’s filled out nicely by some of The Attractions’ best performances (see “New Lace Sleeves” and “White Knuckles” especially for evidence of this; oh and “Watch Your Step”, too) and (this is the important part here) the best production work of Nick Lowe’s career. I mean, listen to how the instruments SOUND on this album. I would actually argue that it’s one of the best-sounding records in my entire collection and on that level it definitely has a slight advantage over Imperial Bedroom and especially over the overproduced records that came immediately afterwards.

    With all that said, I believe Imperial Bedroom to be EC’s masterpiece. I’ve gone on about this album before and it’s very well-loved, so I won’t go too far into depth, but I think Mr. Mod hit the nail on the head here. It contains some of his most straightforward lyrics, especially on songs like “Human Hands” and “Town Cryer” (side 2 gems), and it’s always held a special place in my heart for that reason.

    As for East Side Story, I love it and it was a quantum leap from their previous albums (though what’s up with the disses here towards Argybargy, also a great album, as well as “Is That Love?”, which BTW is indeed on East Side Story; it opens up side 2). EC’s influence on it is crucial. He not only appears as a backing vocalist on “Tempted”, but he also co-wrote “There’s No Tomorrow”. Furthemore, not only did Glenn Tilbrook appear on Trust‘s “From a Whisper to a Scream”, but EC collaborated with Chris Difford on “Boy with a Problem”. Thankfully, he fixed some of Difford’s lyrics and the version that made it onto Imperial Bedroom was much better than the original one, but yeah I agree that he kicked them in the ass and vice versa. It’s almost important to remember that after EC got a piano in 1980, he started writing a lot more songs that way, hence material like “Boy with a Problem” and “Shot with His Own Gun” (among many others).

    All of this brings me to the main question at hand. Would I pick Trust or East Side Story? Honestly, I don’t know, but I would probably have to go with Trust.

    Oh and plurby, I’ve got both of those mp3s. I’ll send them tonight.

  20. BigSteve

    I’m not going to choose between the two albums, because I don’t think music is like the WWF. I will say just to make plurbie jealous that I did see that EC/Squeeze tour from this era. It was memorable to me mainly because Elvis didn’t seem to hate everybody and everything anymore, and he was beginning to learn how to integrate crooning with rocking.

  21. BigSteve

    Another point … one of the reasons both records sound so great is probably Roger Bechirian, who is also listed as producer on ESS and as associate producer on Trust.

  22. Another point … one of the reasons both records sound so great is probably Roger Bechirian, who is also listed as producer on ESS and as associate producer on Trust.

    That’s a great point Steve. I’m as guilty of anyone of forgetting to mention Bechirian’s contributions, so thanks for the reminder. He not only worked on Trust, but the first 4 EC albums as well, where he was the engineer (or “associate producer”, if you will, though I don’t think he’s listed as such). He was Geoff Emerick to Nick Lowe’s George Martin, if you will, and yes I’m very well aware of the irony of that statement given that Emerick ended up producing Imperial Bedroom, but I’ll stand by it nonetheless.

    Oh and Bechirian also produced the 1st 3 Undertones records. For all these reasons, I think he should be knighted.

  23. BigSteve

    I also wanted to say that I suspect EC’s great contribution as ‘producer’ of the first Specials album consisted of telling them to play it live in the studio just like they did live in the club. That record was engineered by Dave Jordan, who did the Stones’ Love You Live and Some Girls.

  24. BigSteve

    Anothernother point … was Gilson Lavis a great drummer or what? This often came through even on record, but live he was the real sparkplug of the band. With a less forceful, swinging drummer, Squeeze’s music might have seemed a bit twee. Difford’s lyrics tend to be a bit foursquare, so it was a big advantage to have someone on the drum throne mixing it up.

  25. Anothernother point … was Gilson Lavis a great drummer or what? This often came through even on record, but live he was the real sparkplug of the band. With a less forceful, swinging drummer, Squeeze’s music might have seemed a bit twee. Difford’s lyrics tend to be a bit foursquare, so it was a big advantage to have someone on the drum throne mixing it up.

    Again, a great point Steve. One of the reasons that I opted not to go see Squeeze on their current reunion tour is because they’re missing Gilson as well as a keyboardist from one of their classic albums (whether it be Jools Holland or Paul Carrack). I could deal with seeing them with a different keyboardist, but the lack of Gilson is pretty much a dealbreaker for me. It’s not really Squeeze without him. They should just call it Difford/Tilbrook.

  26. Mr. Moderator

    Nice to see props for Roger Bechirian, one of the overlooked engineers of rock and, as Townsman Berlyant pointed out, a fine producer in his own right. I’m pretty sure he also produced that great “Judy”/”pH Factor” single by The dB’s. Don’t recall whether he engineered the second record.

  27. Big Steve,

    You hit the nail on the head concerning a crucial milestone in Costello’s career. I too recall that the Costello/Squeeze tour was the beginning of Elvis’ campaign to show all that he wasn’t an absolute prick. Real bad move. The need for attention screwed up his modus operadi songwriting wise. Come to think of it, affected the punch of the band as well. After Trust, the combo is a lot less aggressive.

    I definitely don’t want a tenderhearted Costello. Without the aggression, he more or less sounds like a run of the mill Squeeze offering.

    Sincerely,
    E. Pluribus

  28. After Trust, the combo is a lot less aggressive

    Hey plurby, have you ever heard Blood and Chocolate? If not, seek it out, skip to the second track (“I Hope You’re Happy Now”) and tell me he wasn’t as full of bile (or that the Attractions weren’t as aggressive, for that matter) on that song as he was in the late ’70s and very early ’80s.

    You can also try the same thing with Brutal Youth. In that case, try the song “20% Amnesia”. Perhaps I’ll post them later.

  29. Matt,

    I’m a big fan of “I Hope You’re Happy Now.” As far as the other track is concerned, I haven’t heard it. Two aggressive kernels in a post Trust career of 16 years of solid crap does not lead one to the conclusion that Costello continues to be in a foul mood.

    Your using the Moderator’s formula for evaluating careers. It doesn’t add up.

    Sincerely,
    E. Pluribus

  30. Mr. Moderator

    Honestly, who cares whether Costello lost his “bile” or not? Who cares if he’s backslapping and making friends these days? All I care about is his music, and it’s dropped off sharply. I think a major factor in his drop off is the loss of Bruce Thomas…

    Seriously, though, how weird was Squeeze? The singer writes lyrics w/o music; the guy who croaks writes the music to the singer’s words. The lead singer is also a great guitarist. Do they have pub rock roots? What’s their background (that is, beyond the John Cale story and anything else I already know)?

  31. You have that exactly backwards.

    Difford = lyrics
    Tilbrook = music

    Their background is, you would likely be surprised to learn, strictly Sarf London wideboy: they were, not to put too fine a point on it, basically street thugs, or at the very least traveled in street-thug circles. Note how many of Difford’s lyrics on the early albums are about criminal life: they were largely taken from stories he heard around the pubs.

    Difford was also a first-class speed freak throughout the first Squeeze epoch, incidentally.

  32. Honestly, who cares whether Costello lost his “bile” or not? Who cares if he’s backslapping and making friends these days? All I care about is his music, and it’s dropped off sharply,

    Well, I think Plurb’s point is a pretty good one even in the context of just Costello’s music. There are certainly some exceptions, but it’s not clear that Costello was ever convincing more than briefly with a gentler, crooning singing tone and less hostilely “thoughtful” lyrics. Imperial Bedroom being the major exception and yet perhaps the exception that proves the rule, in that it complicates his hostility without quite abandoning it.

    Again, I would not say this point is absolutely true, but to a significant degree I buy it.

  33. Mr. Moderator

    Thanks for the correction and background on Squeeze, Great One. I always get that music and lyrics thing mixed up with them.

    Mwall, you and Plurb will have to disagree with me on the kinder, gentler Costello. I have enjoyed a number of songs by him in his post-Trust career. The big difference in quality, for me, comes down to his post-Attractions backing bands and post-Lowe productions. Even the albums I dislike, such as Spike and Mighty Like a Turd have songs I would like much better if recorded in a way that highlights what Costello really does best. And what he does best includes the bile, but it’s more than that. With The Attractions he could pull on McCartney influences, Kinks influences, Band influences, etc. Without them, he sometimes tried to recast himself to reflect his interest in what I’ll call post-developmental influences. A good example is the influence of Tom Waits on …Turd. You know he didn’t grow up caring about Tom Waits. He was an acquired taste for EC. Any time an artist starts working acquired tastes into his or her art, it’s “danger Will Robinson” time. The result is often awkward at best. I think artists do better developing within their “wheelhouse,” within their core influences and strengths.

  34. Fritz,

    Specifically, what are your problems with “Is That Love?”. You really went apeshit when I posted that clip. I listened to it again last night, and I thought it was pretty solid. What gives?

    Your brother,
    E. Pluribus

  35. Mr. Moderator

    I think it’s jealousy, E. Pluribus, jealousy on behalf of the magnificent Jellyfish.

  36. hrrundivbakshi

    Plurbs —

    I thought I made my objections to the song fairly clear: excessive, lopsided “structure;” too much overt Beatle-ism; twee melody. It’s just prock bullshit, from one end to the other. Stack that song up against, say, “Pulling Mussels From a Shell” (another very “power pop” number from Squeeze), and you’ll see, I think, what makes “Is That Love” so ungainly. In general, popping a well-crafted rock palate cleanser into your mouth is enough to make you realize you’ve been suckin’ on a corn-studded turd without realizing it.

    Your pal,

    HVB

  37. I’m a big fan of “I Hope You’re Happy Now.” As far as the other track is concerned, I haven’t heard it. Two aggressive kernels in a post Trust career of 16 years of solid crap does not lead one to the conclusion that Costello continues to be in a foul mood.

    Your using the Moderator’s formula for evaluating careers. It doesn’t add up.

    I only used two of the most bile-filled songs in Costello’s post-Trust career to illustrate my point. I could have used many others, particularly “How to Be Dumb” and “Hurry Down Doomsday (The Bugs are Taking Over”), both off of RTH’s favorite EC album Mighty Like a Rose. The former is an all-out assault against Bruce Thomas that was written after he wrote The Big Wheel (itself a thinly-veiled assault on EC) and the latter is a post-apocalyptic rant that also contains more bile against Bruce (amongst other people and things as well).

    I guess my greater point is that his bile/anger/whatever you wanna call it never went away, but you just have to dig a little deeper to find it as it’s not in the forefront like on his 1st few albums.

  38. Mr. Moderator

    Townsman Berlyant, EC could have been ranint against Hitler while Nazi Germany was in full, disgraceful flight and those …Turd songs you cite still would have sucked. Quit while you’re ahead. Plurbs’ biggest problem here is that he wants Costello to be a figurehead asshole on his behalf. Don’t get me wrong, because I say what I’m about to say with deep love, respect, and the utmost admiration, but E. Plurbs is a righteous, truth-telling asshole in his own right. He need not depend on Costello to do his bidding.

  39. While “Is That Love” is far from my favorite Squeeze song, I too don’t quite see Hrundi’s problem with it. It’s too wordy, but Difford’s lyrics were almost always so. (He’s kind of the Bernie Taupin of new wave; Tilbrook’s melodies bailed him out time and again.)

  40. Fritz,

    I stacked ’em up. “Is That Love” wins hands down.

    I don’t get it. Anybody else understand what what Fritz is getting at?

    Sincerely.
    E. Pluribus

  41. Berlyant,

    You know I love you and would never do or say anything to destroy the firm bond we’ve built over the years. That said, what’s it like to blow Costello?

    Just having fun,
    E. Pluribus

  42. hrrundivbakshi

    Plurbs/all: the song is FAKEY. *That’s* its problem.

    Okay?

    HVB

  43. What, this is an authenticity issue?

    (I’m kidding, of course.)

  44. I’m with you, Oats. Something more is going on here than meets the eye. Somehow or another it most probably have something to do with women’s empowerment, Bob Dylan, San Francisco Hippies, or what’s commonly referred to as John Fogerty Symdrome, i.e. having a chip on one’s shoulder for reasons known only to one’s self.

    Give it time. I’m sure the real reason’s for Fritz’s wrath will emerge.

    Hope all is well,
    E. Pluribus

  45. Mr Mod sez

    Any time an artist starts working acquired tastes into his or her art, it’s “danger Will Robinson” time.

    Nice! I’ll keep this little quote in my back pocket next time we have a…..um……discussion…about one of your new songs!

  46. Mr. Moderator

    Andyr, bad news: All your tracks were accidentally erased!

  47. That reminds me. I wanted to comment on this.

    Any time an artist starts working acquired tastes into his or her art, it’s “danger Will Robinson” time.

    So, once you become a songwriter, stop seeking out new sounds, new avenues? Abandon curiosity! Create with prejudice!

  48. Not to Worry, Mr Mod. I’ve have all of the various mixes, including just the naked 2-track drum mixes, and I’ve been working the stuff at “The Neptunes”.

    Pharrell and I have been cooking up some dope NH mixes. I’ll send them to you.

  49. Berlyant,

    When you’re through blowing Costello, e-mail me those MP3s.

    Sincerely,
    E. Pluribus

  50. Fritz,

    A little advice. When all seems out of kilter, and one begins asking one’s self “meaning of life” like questions, flop the Gang of Four Entertainment LP on the turntable. In the words of Paul Anka, they “slice like a fucking hammer” through the bullshit.

    Trust me. You’ll find their essence rare in times of trouble.

    Yours,
    E. Pluribus

  51. 2000 Man

    I’m not going to choose between the two albums, because I don’t think music is like the WWF.

    BigSteve, I hate to say it, but apparently music is the new WWF. 50 Cent says he’ll quit if Kanye West sells more than he does on Sept. 11.

    http://news.yahoo.com/s/ap/20070811/ap_en_mu/people50_cent

    Maybe we can get a steel cage match between Mick Jagger and Steven Tyler’s lips.

  52. BigSteve

    50 Cent’s retirement would be a tragic loss for music. If he were half the man Kanye is, I’d call him Quarter.

  53. While “Is That Love” is far from my favorite Squeeze song, I too don’t quite see Hrundi’s problem with it. It’s too wordy, but Difford’s lyrics were almost always so. (He’s kind of the Bernie Taupin of new wave; Tilbrook’s melodies bailed him out time and again.)

    This is by far the best comment in this entire thread (sorry I didn’t get to it sooner). Furthermore, I would add that Difford and Tilbrook were the Bernie Taupin and Elton John of New Wave. Why? Well Bernie and Chris were the non-performers (well in Chris’ case, he sang occasionally and played guitar, but nowhere near as well as Tilbrook) who wrote all the lyrics whereas Elton and Glenn were the musicians who, not coincidentally, also wrote all the music. In both cases, they were also unusually the lead vocalists in their respective bands, though of course Elton’s a solo act, so it’s a bit different. Nevertheless, I maintain my position and that this comparison is much more accurate than the new Lennon/McCartney tag that was brandied about in the early ’80s.

    Also, count me in amongst the people who have no clue what Fritz’s problem with “Is That Love” is. It’s far from my favorite Squeeze song, but it’s a fine tune otherwise.

    Oh and hey plurby, sorry for slacking on those mp3s. It’s been on my to-do list for almost a week now. I’ll get them out tonight.

  54. Matt,

    Thanks for checking in with me about the MP3s. I did indeed believe you might have forgetten about them. Glad to hear you’re a little less tied up.

    Talk to ya soon,
    E. Pluribus

  55. […] Clock albums and get fixated on one and then another. I had that moment as a youngin’ with Trust, which for a long time took my number one spot as the BEST Costello […]

 
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