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Happiness StanHappiness Stan on Happy 80th Birthday, Ringo!
Having dismissed him as just the drummer when I was a teenager, my respect for him has increased considerably over the years, I think I'd always have had a better time hanging out with him or George than John or Paul. I heard Photograph on the radio the other day and had a similar response to yours. A few weeks ago I heard Back off Boogaloo again, what a great record. It was also the first single I bought. Peace and love
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on Battle Royale: Political Figures Who Rock
That Screaming Lord Sutch clip is great, Happiness Stan! He's one of those people whose name I've always heard, but I don't think I'd ever heard a lick of his music or knew anything about him. The music is pretty convincing, as far as hokey Vampire Rock goes, but the reactions from the audience are priceless.
Happiness StanHappiness Stan on Battle Royale: Political Figures Who Rock
Hi LMK, even though he started in music, and doesn't strictly count, I couldn't resist the opportunity to share the clip. He was spectacularly unsuccessful in both careers, unfortunately, though whether ultimately he intended to be is probably moot. He was probably better known as a failed politician when he killed himself in his late fifties, the gutter press always presented him as a threat to the national way of life, most people just thought he was taking the p, which he was, along with crying for help. Our prime minister for nearly half of the seventies, Edward Heath, was an accomplished classical pianist, and conducted orchestras, but hardly fare for the Hall. Until recently there was a bunch of MPs who were also a pretty uninspiring pub covers band. Failing to take oneself far too seriously is the kiss of death for British politicians. Apart from ohserving that narcissism and self delusion have been commodities in even greater supply than usual amongst those who put themselves forward to lead us over the last five years at least, I'll stop there.
geo on Battle Royale: Political Figures Who Rock
Wow! Sarah makes Nixon shine.
geo on Battle Royale: Political Figures Who Rock
Funny how easy it is to be nostalgic about Nixon these days. Wonder why that is?
geo on Battle Royale: Political Figures Who Rock
The Japanese Ambassador clip was great, but that better be an American Strat!
geo on All About the Modulation
The technique of going up, usually a whole step, to give a closing verse a kick is very common. But what I was thinking was songs that modulate repeatedly repeating a basic chord pattern in multiple keys. The Cash moves up a fourth, then up a fourth again, and then heads back down. There are two cool things about how he handles this. When he goes to the second verse, up a fourth from E to A, he takes the melody down a fifth, heading into his deepest register. Next verse he heads up to sing at the D above the A, then back down to the D, and finally in the last verse on the E an octave below where he did the first verse. Johnny can go down for the last verse because his low voice is his big payoff, unlike most mortals. The other thing that is cool is that the intro is like a summary of the whole tune, the intro chords are E-A-D-A-E, which is the basic modulations through the song. Dizzy is a really cool one. I love the way that moves around. You mention that that one moves in fourths. I think most of these songs that use repeated modulations use fourths, or maybe fifths, or three keys in a loop that are a I, a IV and a IV. The whole step ending modulation is usually just to give a repeat some kick. It doesn't need to easily find its way back. Also, that was a great explanation by Cher. I know this stuff, but completely lack any facility with it, particularly since I don't play a chord instrument.
ladymisskirroyaleladymisskirroyale on Battle Royale: Political Figures Who Rock
H. Stan, that clip is very impressive! While I hadn't heard of him before, Mr. Royale was well aware of his music, as he enjoys the ol visionary/crackpot/genius. Question, though: did he start out in "music" and then move to politics (see Sonny Bono) or the other way around?
Happiness StanHappiness Stan on Battle Royale: Political Figures Who Rock
No election night in Britain was complete without the cameras cutting to whichever constituency this gentleman was standing on the day. Despite standing 39 times as a prospective parliamentary candidate for the National Teenage Party, many of whose policies were late enshrined in law, and latterly the Monster Raving Loony party, which he founded in the eighties, he never received more than a thousand votes and lost the deposit candidates have to put forward to discourage the frivolous. There are lots of versions of this on YouTube, the audience reaction on this 1964 clip, before people knew what was coming next, gets me every time https://youtu.be/c2ZsWENob1s
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on All About the Modulation
@cher: That's cool stuff. I get that. Playing through those progressions you give as examples, I'm immediately familiar with their use in some well-known songs, and I realize I've done some of this in my own songwriting, intuitively Now that I see what the pattern or "game" is behind it, I will likely run rampant and see how often and creatively (at least for my own amusement) I can exploit it.
cherguevaracherguevara on All About the Modulation
Another way to modulate is to use an "applied dominant" or the "five of five." For example, if you're writing a tune in C major, G major would be the 5 chord (dominant). The 2 chord would normally be D minor. If you instead used a D major chord, that would be the 5 chord in G major. So you can use that as a way to modulate, ie say you play one bar each: C maj. F maj. D maj. G maj. This can be done to modulate, or to "tonicize," which is to say, to move out of the key for a moment, then back. There are a bunch of different ways to do this, but this is one. Dizzy builds a few applied dominant chords on III instead, for example (a B7 chord in the key of G in the choruses and an A Major chord in the key of F in the verses). Or instead of a V chord you could apply a vii chord. My music theory is fuzzy, though, but there are plenty of place to look up this stuff.
chickenfrank on Battle Royale: Political Figures Who Rock
LMKR, I would have guessed that was Anita Bryant. What is with her stiff old lady hair-style? The lack of talent is unsurprising.
chickenfrank on Battle Royale: Political Figures Who Rock
Wow, that Foss clip. Full of sound and fury, signifying nothing.
Scott (the other one)Scott (the other one) on All About the Modulation
Cheesy manipulative trick? You betcha, and I'm all in for it. Especially when done by someone you wouldn't think would go for it, such as R.E.M. on "Shaking Through." But a special shout out to stuff like "Penny Lane," which modulates downward at the end—those tricksy lads bein' all tricksy and whatnot.
ladymisskirroyaleladymisskirroyale on Battle Royale: Political Figures Who Rock
I have gone down a musical rabbit hole. Unfortunately there are too many politicians who think they can play music. This is perhaps my favorite: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=FCl0b77qB1w
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on Battle Royale: Political Figures Who Rock
Wow, ladymisskirroyale, how did I, a founding member of a band named after that ivory tickler, never see that clip before? I think we've got our uber-serious Ray Manzarek character in this political band.
ladymisskirroyaleladymisskirroyale on Battle Royale: Political Figures Who Rock
Check this out: Bailey keeps her sense of humor intact, Nixon looks pretty...well, take a look for yourself. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G7hLY91FU0k
ladymisskirroyaleladymisskirroyale on All About the Modulation
If I'm understanding modulation correctly, I think that "Walkin' After Midnight" is an example.
andyr on Deep Dive on This Fugazi Clip
The dude in the bottom right-hand corner of the screen with the Gorillas? (@ 45 sec) who could be dancing in a Charlie Brown Cartoon!
andyr on Middle Eights That Dominate Relative to the Song Into Which They Are Set
XTC has a bunch of them - Mayor of Simpleton is another great one. The Jam has many too - from the first album "Got by in Time" also "Going underground" The Hollies - "Carrie Anne" has to be a top-10
andyr on Middle Eights That Dominate Relative to the Song Into Which They Are Set
The Hollies - "Carrie Anne" has to be a top-10 XTC has a bunch of them - Mayor of Simpleton is another great one. The Jam has many too - from the first album "Got by in Time" also "Going underground"
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on All About the Modulation
The two examples Geo gave were good to get me started, because I usually cringe at the modulation device. Those examples, like "Dizzy," as cited by Cher, do add to the song itself. It's funny, as much as I love the Kinks and Who examples that Chickenfrank cited, I don't get an extra charge out of the modulation. By that point in each song, I'm already putty in the hands of the song, looking up at it with big puppy dog eyes. The modulation only stood out to me when I first learned how to play those songs. There's nothing like barre chords to make modulations easy! I wish I knew more of the music theory that is possible to unlock by using this device. People often do whole step modulations, right? Can you modulate by greater leaps (or by only a half step up the neck, in guitarist terms) and get anything workable? Can you make a great leap in modulation and suddenly change the structure of the melody, so that the singer isn't making a ridiculous stretch to hit new notes in their original structure?
H. MunsterH. Munster on Last Man Standing: Artists Whose Professional Name Changed Mid-Career
Clyde Battin first recorded as part of the duo Gary and Clyde. By the time he joined the Byrds, he was Skip Battin.
chickenfrank on All About the Modulation
I don't think I understood modulation as a music listener. It wasn't until I started to play music that I learned it wasn't just chord changes happening, (which are normal for a song) but a complete key change which is a whole new bag. Wish I understood music theory better. The Gil Scott-Heron example is a great one of it being used well. It does keep you off-balance and engaged throughout all the changes. Che is right that you hear it in power ballads all the time. You hear it in Broadway show tunes frequently too. It can be a really cheap trick to create a sense of elevating the emotion or the upward exultation path of the song. The emotion is "raised" right along with the key going higher. That's why it is usually in the cheesy corner. But it's used so often because it works! I like when it is used to create as Geo says pandemonium rather than a feeling of bursting triumph. I love the tension the key changes create in You Really Got Me and My Generation. They don't feel natural or expected.
cherguevaracherguevara on All About the Modulation
It's become a bit of a joke move in the genre of diva-power ballads (like here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KVh0_DQtwyU ), but still effective if it has an element of surprise. The first song that comes to mind is Dizzy, by Tommy Roe, which I think works well because it keeps a simple 1-4--5 structure as it moves around the circle of 5ths and the lyrics describe the disorienting, constant modulation: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=arpidGq8SlA
Happiness StanHappiness Stan on Last Man Standing: Artists Whose Professional Name Changed Mid-Career
Apologies, the page must have still been loading when I used find. Neil Innes = Ron Nasty LMS again, but not for long, probably
geo on Last Man Standing: Artists Whose Professional Name Changed Mid-Career
As he was in post 79. I am still Last Man Standing.
Happiness StanHappiness Stan on Last Man Standing: Artists Whose Professional Name Changed Mid-Career
Andy Partridge was also Sir John Johns
geo on Last Man Standing: Artists Whose Professional Name Changed Mid-Career
Arthur Russell wrote, produced and remixed several 12" dance singles under the name "Killer Whale."
H. MunsterH. Munster on Last Man Standing: Artists Whose Professional Name Changed Mid-Career
Huey Lewis appears as Huey Louis on the albums he recorded with Clover.
Happiness StanHappiness Stan on Last Man Standing: Artists Whose Professional Name Changed Mid-Career
Hi Geo, that's cool, thanks, I was merely wishing to clarify for my own benefit. My interpretation of the rules was that the change needed to have some intention of permanent, and precluded an artist retaining their identity behind a thinly disguised, one off pseudonym. This clarification has, fortunately or unfortunately depending on one's point of view opened the flood gates to the contest potentially going on for several more weeks without Mr Mod's intervention. Disgraced former pop svengali Jonathan King had a hit with Jump Up and Down and Wave Your Knickers in the Air under the name of St Lucia.
geo on Last Man Standing: Artists Whose Professional Name Changed Mid-Career
Mr Mod/Happiness, Oh yeah. That is definitely a credit, not a nick name. I will admit to having leaned heavily on several groups with loads of members that consistently renamed every bandmember, sometimes album to album. That's why Mr. Mod's steal on "Bert Camembert so rattled me; how had I completely neglected Gong, yet another band who spun off ever more ridiculous band credits? To be fair, I tried to bring something other than rote enumeration of these endless reservoirs of potential answers. Swamp Dogg. That Flo of Flo and Eddie was actually short for his original fake name of The Phlorescent Leech, a far more colorful appellation for the large, amorphous Mark Volman With all of that in mind, "Shakti Yoni" of Gong's "Camembert Electronique continued to provide her space whispers under the name "The Good Witch Yoni" on "Radio Gnome Invisible Part 1, The Flying Teapot." Respectfully, LMS
geo on Middle Eights That Dominate Relative to the Song Into Which They Are Set
That Cream bridge really dominated the song since the song title "Badge" was a misreading of the label "Bridge" that Harrison had put on the chords he had written for that section.
geo on The Music World’s Most Intriguing Hairdo…and Chris Stapleton
That may be worse.
Happiness StanHappiness Stan on Last Man Standing: Artists Whose Professional Name Changed Mid-Career
Thanks Mr Mod, a third variant for the Motorheadmeister was Lemmy Kilmister, the surname later being dropped
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on Last Man Standing: Artists Whose Professional Name Changed Mid-Career
@Happiness Stan, good question! This battle has gone on so long that I've forgotten how I intended that rule to apply. I think I meant a nickname like The Boss or Mix or Macca, one that fans and writers use that isn't one the artist uses on credits.
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on Middle Eights That Dominate Relative to the Song Into Which They Are Set
Strong entry, BigSteve!
BigSteveBigSteve on Middle Eights That Dominate Relative to the Song Into Which They Are Set
The Cream song Badge (which gets its name from a misreading of Bridge on the lyric sheet) really opens up in that middle section that goes "Yes, I told you that the light goes up and down," going into the guitar solo afterwards. It's more than eight bars, but so are some of the 'middle eights' mentioned so far.
mockcarrmockcarr on Last Man Standing: Artists Whose Professional Name Changed Mid-Career
Marvin Gaye used the initial spelling Gay for a while in DC doo wop groups, I believe there was a lot of looseness in the names depending on the gig and who he was singing with, but I’m pretty sure he was on some late 50s releases as a vocalist before going to Detroit. last mane standing
BigSteveBigSteve on The Music World’s Most Intriguing Hairdo…and Chris Stapleton
I think that's a wig. At least the top part. I did a Google image search on his name, and there are a variety of unconvincing hairdos, leading up to more recent photos where he wears a hat or a bandana.
Happiness StanHappiness Stan on Last Man Standing: Artists Whose Professional Name Changed Mid-Career
Point of order, Mr Geo, sir. Having reread the rules, does Ms Honeyman qualify under section 2, "Newly acquired nicknames do NOT count if the artist still has an underlying name he or she is credited by"?
geo on Last Man Standing: Artists Whose Professional Name Changed Mid-Career
Susie Honeyman fiddled under the fabulous pseudonym "Avadne Garde" on the Mekons Honky Tonkin.'
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on The Music World’s Most Intriguing Hairdo…and Chris Stapleton
Thanks, geo. Jon is such a good writer - and such a good frontman for John Train! It kind of sucks, but more importantly it's great how jealous I can get of his special talents.
Happiness StanHappiness Stan on Last Man Standing: Artists Whose Professional Name Changed Mid-Career
J Henry Burnett recorded with The B-52 Band & the Fabulous Skylarks prior to changing to T Bone Burnett
geo on Last Man Standing: Artists Whose Professional Name Changed Mid-Career
Merely Pigpen on the first Grateful Dead album, he revealed himself to be Ron McKernan on the subsequent Anthem of the Sun.
geo on The Music World’s Most Intriguing Hairdo…and Chris Stapleton
Do I ever finish a comment before I hit send? I don't think so. Here's the link. https://www.trainarmy.com/post/wire-from-the-bunker-meet-david-allan-coe
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on The Music World’s Most Intriguing Hairdo…and Chris Stapleton
@geo, I think you forgot to include the link. I'd like to see how that informs my interest in his hair. Thank you.
2000 Man2000 Man on The Music World’s Most Intriguing Hairdo…and Chris Stapleton
I love seeing that picture of Coe's stupid hair. Now when I think of his racist songs, I can also think of everyone that ever met him laughing at that stupid hair.
ladymisskirroyaleladymisskirroyale on Last Man Standing: Artists Whose Professional Name Changed Mid-Career
Kim Deal = Mrs. John Murphy
chickenfrank on Middle Eights That Dominate Relative to the Song Into Which They Are Set
Yes. That high bass line thing she does during the break is cool.

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