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2000 Man2000 Man on A Replacement Post
cdm, I liked your Replacement playlist. I think I'd have added Color Me Impressed from Hootenanny, which I think is their earliest song that kind of makes me think they might be something special. Not that I had any idea who hey were when that came out, but I definitely think that's the earliest song I really, really like. So since I liked your Spotify playlist I followed you. I don't know what that does because I've never done it before, but I think I can check out your playlists. Now the pressure is on!
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on Making Amends for My Under-appreciation of Marty Stuart
Hank Fan! I forgot about him. He was a solid Townsperson, one of the many I didn't know personally but who projected a strong personality with us.
trigmogigmotrigmogigmo on Making Amends for My Under-appreciation of Marty Stuart
Aha! So it was Hank Fan. Great cover art indeed. ... found it, if the link works: https://media.gettyimages.com/photos/country-musician-merle-haggard-and-his-band-merle-haggard-the-pose-picture-id74050774?s=2048x2048
geo on Making Amends for My Under-appreciation of Marty Stuart
It was provided by a user appropriately named "Hank Fan." It is really good and included artwork featuring a young Merle Haggard and band.
hrrundivbakshihrrundivbakshi on Making Amends for My Under-appreciation of Marty Stuart
Trig, I wish I could take credit for that, but I don't think it was me.
trigmogigmotrigmogigmo on Making Amends for My Under-appreciation of Marty Stuart
HVB: If memory serves that you were the source, I still have random tunes from your mix tape "I Can't Hold Myself In Line: Classic Country 1965-1975" pop up in my car when I'm listening on shuffle everything mode. Always worth a listen even if that ain't my wheelhouse. Trivia: Tennessee Ernie Ford retired to my little Bay Area hometown after his heyday and lived there when I was growing up. That was and is pretty much the extent of my knowledge of him beyond Wikipedia.
cdmcdm on Making Amends for My Under-appreciation of Marty Stuart
Sidebar: I was all set to hit you with the fact that Speedy West played the opening swoop on the Bugs Bunny. Out of an abundance caution, I went to verify that. Turns out I've been wrong all these years. It was actually a guy named Freddy Tavardes. Feddy was also on the design team for the Stratocaster and the Bassman amp. Not a bad legacy.
hrrundivbakshihrrundivbakshi on Making Amends for My Under-appreciation of Marty Stuart
Whoops, sorry, that’s them doing the duo thing. Even better.
hrrundivbakshihrrundivbakshi on Making Amends for My Under-appreciation of Marty Stuart
Here are Speedy and Jimmy cheesin’ it up with Tennessee Ernie Ford. They come in around 1:35. https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=TuGvIVnWnTM
hrrundivbakshihrrundivbakshi on Making Amends for My Under-appreciation of Marty Stuart
That Letterman clip is hotter than a fox. The harmony guitar duet thing reminded me of the amazing stuff Speedy West and Jimmy Bryant used to do back in the 50s. Here in Texas, when you dig for records, more often than not, you end up with a whole lot of country in the pile. Which can be cool if the stuff you find is from the golden age of honky-tonk/truck stop country. Every so often, I’ll find a record with Jimmy Bryant or Speedy on it as session players, which is fun. Never credited, but unmistakable.
geo on Making Amends for My Under-appreciation of Marty Stuart
Marty got a new bass player a while back, Chris Scruggs and all of these clips pre-date him. He's the grandson of Earl Scruggs and the the maternal side of his lineage. He's comparatively young, 38, and plays guitar and, in the Stuart lineup, occasionally switches to pedal steel. I fist saw him on upright in one of Robbie Fulks' bluegrass lineups. Oh, and he is also a monster player just like the rest of them.
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on Making Amends for My Under-appreciation of Marty Stuart
That stuff was pretty awesome, cdm, and you know how much I struggle with country music. Just about everything you posted had a really nice flow to it - thosd bands didn't best anything into the ground. And that guy can play. Even the McGuinn clips worked. If helped that it was my two favorite Dylan covers that The Byrds tackled.
E. Pluribus Gergely on Making Amends for My Under-appreciation of Marty Stuart
Which is why I steered clear from the guy for so long. As always, good call, Chickenfrank. And do me one quick favor. Watch the clip one more time, focusing specifically at 1:12-1:14 and 1:50-1:59. Am I seeing things, or is there definitely something going on between Setzer and Costello? Setzer looks none too happy that he's been asked to stand next to Costello. In a very subtle way, Setzer appears to be letting Costello know that he has no business whatsoever sharing the stage with Setzer's other kindred spirits.
E. Pluribus Gergely on A Replacement Post
When you come up with something that good, you don't need to worry about a bridge.
geo on A Replacement Post
Bull Withers didn't bother to come up with a bridge, or even a chorus, and EPG gives him a pass. What's up with that?
geo on A Replacement Post
As at least an interesting historical note, X included a demo of "I Will Dare" as an outtake on an expanded release. It's just drums, bass, and vocal but it's pretty interesting to hear it stripped down and sung by Doe. It is not really a reinterpretation; it's totally based on the Replacements version. I think it makes a pretty decent case that there is a good song there. And since it "mildly" entertained EPG, I feel secure in making that claim. https://youtu.be/6VihzKeNYHQ
cdmcdm on A Replacement Post
"Don’t tell me what I can listen to and only mildly enjoy. " Legitimately laughing out loud.
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on A Replacement Post
Don't tell me what I can listen to and only mildly enjoy. I've had "Can't Hardly Wait" playing in my head since our Zoom meeting. That's one song I greatly like by them. I didn't want to share any of my preliminary thoughts, because I'm older and wiser and kinder and gentler. But you know what? If I don't share those deep-set feelings, I don't have the chance to be proven wrong. I will keep listening. I know that I've always liked Sorry, Ma... the best because it sounded like it came out of the blue, like the template wasn't set yet.
E. Pluribus Gergely on A Replacement Post
All that's more than fair, CDM. I got what I wanted. Someone finally said, "Yeah, I know it's nothing to write home about, but I Iike it anyway."
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on A Replacement Post
I'm pretty much caught up on what you have been posting and it's brilliant stuff! I'm also listening to cdm's mix and enjoying it enough, as is always the case when I listen to them.
cdmcdm on A Replacement Post
BigSteve, very good point. Oats, I'm not suggesting that they were a hardcore band. I'm saying the were kind of lumped in that category at first by casual observers because they were playing loud aggressive music and saying things like Fuck School. When they were still trying to find their footing, I think they tried the costume on, found it ill-fitting and adapted via musical growth. Mod and EPG: Please don't think that you are doing us favors by deigning to listen to the Replacements. If you don't wanna know, you don't wanna know. Or to quote the movie Airplane: "Chump don't want the help, chump don't get the help."
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on A Replacement Post
I've got a lot to catch up on, as I'm swamped with work, but before I go back and revisit The Replacements, to see if my mind has changed in my kinder, gentler years, let me throw down this baseline feeling I have. WARNING: It's not a pretty reflection of me. The Replacements and many other bands that are popular with certain music lovers I love as people but whose '70s-Rock background I don't get play the equivalent of what I would call superhero movie rock. When my firstborn was young, I could take him to a Spiderman movie and get enough enjoyment over the action, the bits of humor, the love interest... Those kinds of movies know when to hit their mark and can nail it. However, I would leave those movies knowing I was played. They left me with no meat to chew on. The Replacements to...Kiss: it's all the same for me. They're like any of the Charlie's Angels who weren't Farrah. Yeah, the are cute and thin and look good running for 10 yards, but Jaclyn Smith and Kate Jackson do nothing for me. Even Farrah's replacement, Cheryl Ladd, was objectively hot, but I wouldn't want to sit through a dinner with her. This is how I feel about all Rock music (see also Aerosmith). To me, The Replacements are nothing more than a "woke" Rock band. I have spoken. I feel like I have spoke a truth - not THE truth, mind you, but a truth. #kindergentlerangrymoses
OatsOats on A Replacement Post
Sorry, I have to push back a little on this "early Replacements is hardcore" line. Yes, the Stink EP was an attempt at that, probably owing to an inferiority complex re: the Huskers. But Sorry Ma... explain to me what is hardcore about that. All I hear are turbo-charged songs about falling in love, getting fucked up, and being bored. It's closer to the Ramones than anything, but it's also not that. The band is too on fire to worry about paying necessary homage to any particular group or production style.
2000 Man2000 Man on A Replacement Post
cdm, I too am a "flawed" Replacements fan. I don't think I ever really heard more than a couple of college radio staples until Pleased To Meet Me and then I bought that CD on a day when I bought a bunch of CD's. When I buy too many things at once it seems like I end up putting one or two of them on the shelf without really listening to it. It was after the band had broken up that I was talking to someone about them, wondered why I never listened to them and then went home and found Pleased to Meet Me on the shelf. I put it on and loved it. I'm okay with their early stuff but it's generally too close to hardcore for me, and I'm just not a hardcore person. The older I get, the less I can listen to things like hardcore or metal. I like Don't Tell A Soul and I think I like the Matt Wallace mix better, but as usual it mostly makes me think that the goobs praising Steve Hoffman and Bernie Grundman are focusing on the least important parts of what makes music great. The guys doing mixing and mastering are just not supposed to mess up, so what was produced is what you hear. Just about any professional seems pretty good at mixing and mastering to me. Things may sound different but not usually remarkably so unless someone has really screwed up. Anyway, I like the Matt Wallace version a lot but I'm just fine with the original one, too. I like Westerberg's solo stuff, too. I've been digging a lot of 80's stuff lately and trying to dig up old Pub Scene records. Some of those are a pain in the ass to get in the US and with the Plague going on I'll wait a bit to order from overseas because I've heard of things taking six months to get here. I was out of town or I'd have joined the Zoom. I don't know what I'd have to offer, but it's always fun to talk about music even though I don't know shit about anything except what I like. BTO rules. Except that Live Live Live album. That's so bad I'm kind of surprised it didn't break the press when they made it.
E. Pluribus Gergely on A Replacement Post
Chickenfrank, you are really something else. You nailed it again. I tried using a similar analogy, but ditched it because my stab was too messy.. Please explain to me why you aren't using your pandemic time to write a book of essays ala Vonnegut's Wampeters, Foma & Granfalloons.
BigSteveBigSteve on A Replacement Post
I like the Replacements even though I can't stand Kiss and Thin Lizzy. I'd say it was Westerberg that I really liked, but his post-Replacements career seems to prove that the band had something that he lacks as a solo artist.
cherguevaracherguevara on A Replacement Replacement Post
I forgot they made electrics - if that is the "Viper" model, it appears it is the choice guitar of MOR rockers: "In late 2015, the reinvigorated Ovation announced a new incarnation for the Viper brand with a couple of Signature Series electric guitars, a Kevin Cronin model, another for Dave Amato (both of REO Speedwagon).[4][5]" - wikipedia
chickenfrank on A Replacement Post
Yeah, we tend to treat REM as your soft underbelly even though it's unfair. There is no shame in not liking the Replacements. There are a lot of valid reasons not to like them. I love roquefort cheese; I like it in salads, on crackers, on a burger. There's not much you could say to change my taste in roquefort, and yet I know it is primarily mold and smells like my feet in summer. I wouldn't try too hard to convince a non-fan how great moldy cheese is. If you look at all the things The Replacements do wrong, then you could almost objectively say they aren't a good band. Doesn't matter. I can't quit this smelly feet band. So many of their songs give me real joy.
BigSteveBigSteve on A Replacement Post
CDM, I didn't mean that *I* thought the Replacements suck. I just meant that saying you think an artist sucks and asking for examples of them not sucking will only lead to a reaffirmation that you still think that artist sucks. The 'change my mind' meme implies that one's mind in unchangeable.
hrrundivbakshihrrundivbakshi on A Replacement Post
Sigh. Not that I need to prove the quality of my musical upbringing to you, but I assure you I received all the early education you seem to feel is necessary. Sheezus.
E. Pluribus Gergely on A Replacement Post
It's amazing how effective that REM jab is. It's been used at least 100 times up here, and it still bothers the living shit out of me. As always, nice one, Chickenfrank. By the way, your terrific post regarding the Replacements really made me want to take a second look. I tried. I really did. Again, there was no meat on the bone whatsoever.
E. Pluribus Gergely on A Replacement Post
Maybe. I honestly think it's a question of getting into lots of good stuff at the get go. All that good stuff formats your brain, not unlike the formatting of a hard drive. I can't speak for all, but my head was formatted with Beatles, Rolling Stones, Motown, and lots of Atlantic soul from my Baltimore aunts. After all that, my head certainly wasn't going to take in mediocre shit. It still doesn't. And actually I do get it. It's a lot like learning a language. The younger you start, the easier it is to master. The whole process gets much more difficult as you get older. It doesn't sink in as well. I realize all this is incredibly arrogant, but that is indeed how I see the situation. The Moderator drives me out of my friggin' skull, but the two of us have that aunt and uncle tastemaker thing in common. He's another one who got the good stuff at the right time. You obviously didn't get it, and it shows.
chickenfrank on A Replacement Post
We tried, Fellas. We tried to help a disadvantaged music listener with a hand up to bring him into the light. Sometimes a person just can't escape the cave, and is left alone with the shadows cast upon the cave walls by Michael Stipe. Don't blame yourselves.
E. Pluribus Gergely on A Replacement Post
Here's something with plenty of meat on the bone. Please listen to this winner from Bill Withers. Don't know why, but I've been thinking about songs with modulations, something I frown upon, because it's one of the crutches a songwriter grabs when he/she gets stuck. I can almost hear Withers chuckling to himself, "Now THAT'S how to use modulation!" https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BbbwiE2GgkE
hrrundivbakshihrrundivbakshi on A Replacement Post
I wonder if it's as simple as EPG not liking the original Replacements "source material." I happen to like Kiss, Thin Lizzy, Led Zeppelin, Big Star, and similar 70s AOR bands — and I'll take the hits from 70s rock radio by bands that otherwise suck: BTO, Foghat, Montrose, etc. I'm betting EPG hates all that stuff. So the resurrection/punk-ification of that genre by the Replacements doesn't appeal, and actually smacks of cheap audience manipulation. Am I on to something here, Plurbs?
E. Pluribus Gergely on A Replacement Post
CDM, I listened to the Replacements songs. The only thing I recall that was mildly entertaining was "I Will Dare." I don't get it. I was looking forward to writing a long post about what I found interesting, annoying, awkward but worthwhile, etc., but there's nothing to write about. Honestly, there's absolutely nothing there.
cdmcdm on A Replacement Post
Wow, I expect this reaction from EPG, but you Bigsteve? I never saw that coming. Anyway, I'm not here to change minds. I'm just here to explain mine.
cdmcdm on A Replacement Replacement Post
I think the lead guitarist and the singer are both playing Ovation electrics.
cherguevaracherguevara on A Replacement Replacement Post
I didn't know that song. It's interesting that music as bland and unctuous as this would somehow make me feel like I want to kill somebody. Please never post that again. The lead guitarist's instrument looks cool, though, I wonder what it is.
chickenfrank on Making Amends for My Under-appreciation of Marty Stuart
Excellent playing. So strange to see a country boy with such an affinity for thick New England scarfs and a Liza Minelli haircut.
trigmogigmotrigmogigmo on Making Amends for My Under-appreciation of Marty Stuart
I dig the Letterman clip especially. That's some tip-top twangy twin telecaster talent there. Good stuff!
BigSteveBigSteve on A Replacement Post
'Change my mind' is a meme for a reason. https://imgflip.com/i/5006x6
cdmcdm on Making Amends for My Under-appreciation of Marty Stuart
He's great on the backup vocals too. I envy you both of those shows.
BigSteveBigSteve on Making Amends for My Under-appreciation of Marty Stuart
I didn't realize that Harry Stinson was the drummer in Stuart's band. What a great player! He really shines on that Letterman clip. I also didn't realize that McGuinn still played that Rickenbacker that has some sort of light fixtures inside that flash when he plays. When I was in grad school in Baton Rouge in 1977 I rode my bike through the darkness to a distant part of town I'd never been to before so I could see McGuinn play with his Thunderbyrd band, and he played that guitar. He was still riding the post-Rolling Thunder hype at the time, and it was a memorable show. (As was the Ry Cooder and Flaco Jimenez show at the same club a few months later. I'm just glad my bike was still there when I got out of the club.)
cdmcdm on A Replacement Post
Oats! We missed you on Friday.
OatsOats on A Replacement Post
Hi, just logging back in to add a few Replacements notes. Bob Mehr's biography of the band from a few years back, Trouble Boys, is excellent. Well-researched and empathetic, with actual insight from Paul, Tommy and others, rather than just propping up the same old myths. Still some of the myths are fun. It seems there are several about the formation of the band. I always liked the one about how they were a garage band trying to cover Bob Stinson's favorite bands, like Yes and Michael Schenker Group. Then Paul joins up and forces them to start listening to the Sex Pistols, Buzzcocks and Dave Edmunds, slowly turning the cover songs into original compositions.
hrrundivbakshihrrundivbakshi on A Replacement Post
Then there was the time the roadies confiscated a bootleg recording of a laughably awful gig. The band found the attempt to profit from the terrible, drunken gig so funny that they themselves released it under the title “The Shit Hits the Fans.”
cdmcdm on A Replacement Post
chicken: I love those songs and almost included love lines but ultimately though it was too jokey. I also came close to including Gary's Got A Boner. It's childish and jokey too but it fucking rocks.
cdmcdm on A Replacement Post
Hrrundi, great video. Along the same lines, I read an article once where the band met with a merch guy that was sent over by the label. Even though t-shirts are a reliable way for bands to make some money, they were so worried about "selling out" that the two ideas they pitched to the guy were: 1. A shirt printed with ink that changed color when exposed to body heat. They wanted the design to disappear when people put it on. 2. A shirt with the bands picture in the armpit. Are these design ideas childish and self defeating? Sure, but they're funny and telling too.
geo on A Replacement Post
EPG, Sadly, I've never heard of the Illinois Speed Press. The reason Seatrain are mysteriously popular with Philadelphians of a certain age, actually a little older than me, is because they played the first giant Earth Day Rally at Belmont Plateau and made quite an impression on the sundazed crowd.

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