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geo on Disappointing
Plurbis, The bass and drums on JWH are great. Listen to, for example, "As I Went Out One Morning." Don't give me a lotta shit on this. They are really grooving. And like the Blind Squirrel getting the nut, you are right on "The Who Sell Out."
E. Pluribus Gergely on Disappointing
Didn't know that! I appreciate the info, but it doesn't matter much to me. Let me restate my problem with the thing: If you opt to use a band behind the songs, have the band do something, anything for that matter, that does something for the songs. And more importantly, never ever listen to the advice of Robbie Robertson. Yes, he did indeed transform "Obviously Five Believers" into a wild thin mercury masterpiece and wrote two masterpieces shortly afterwards, but he spent the rest of his career cranking out snoozer after snoozer. As far as Garth Brooks is concerned, I've never heard him give any kind of coherent interview about anything whatsoever. I don't really think he's capable of giving any kind of advice. He definitely has chops, but it doesn't seem to me that it matters much to him whether he uses them with someone like Dylan or someone crafting an ad for cat litter. And that whole "here's the backstory behind the song" thing is a lot of nonsense. If it sounds bad, it's bad. I can't sell that album. And the reason for that is that it stinks. That said, I miss you and your taste, which is a lot like mine. That's probably why I miss reading your writing so much. Do me favor. Put on The Who Sell Out, and let me know if you think it still holds up. Love that album! And rewatch that Jumpin' Jack Flash clip, especially the 3 second slow motion section of Keith power strumming, with his head cocked to the side, mouth open wide. You know what I'm talkin' about! Finished watching Tiger King. Unbelievable! Me and the Mrs, are now watching Last Tango in Hastings. Superb! E. Pluribus
saturnisminesaturnismine on Disappointing
Plurbis, maybe you know this already, but maybe you don't. You can blame Robbie Robertson's lack of imagination / inner ear for that sparse approach on JWH. What's there was only supposed to be a foundation, which is why it's so basic. Dylan claims he "didn't plan" on it sounding that way. He brought the tapes to Robertson and Garth to add tracks to each tune, but Robertson claims, "We did talk about doing some overdubbing on it, but I really liked it when I heard it and I couldn't really think right about overdubbing on it. So it ended up coming out the way he brought it [to us]."
E. Pluribus Gergely on Disappointing
Just for the record, John Wesley Harding never did anything for me. If you opt to use a band behind the songs, have the band do something, anything for that matter, that does something for the songs. E. Pluribus
geo on Disappointing
Mod - I think of Watching the River Flow as a lost, great, Dylan moment. New Morning came along just 5 months after SP, and redeemed Dylan for me. But this was followed by a long period of silence, especially for a 15 year old that had just finished buying up all of the back catalogue and was waiting for what came next. Watching the River Flow puts it right out there: Bob didn't feel like he had much to say, so he was sayin' it and otherwise keeping quiet. It didn't hurt that I really liked Leon Russell and the record rocked.
geo on Disappointing
saturnismine - I wasn't actually suggesting moving the disappointment threshold back to JWH, just describing my 14 year old ignorance of the Dylan catalogue. I totally assumed Memphis Blues Again would've had to be on the Greatest Hits album if it had been released, totally unaware of the fact that the sound of JWH was nothing like it. I was disappointed strictly because I thought I finally had a copy of MBA...and I was wrong. I don't think JWH is disappointing because it definitely retained the mystique in a way that NS does not. It seems more like when someone emphasizes the importance of what they're saying by reducing the voice to a whisper.
E. Pluribus Gergely on Disappointing
Been thinking a lot about Dylan these days because my 19 year old stepson can't get enough of him. Last week, while Lady Gergely researched the ins and outs of feeding her sourdough starter, her son worked out the intro piano part of "Queen Jane Approximately". We screwed around with that for a while, piano and guitar, until we got it right enough to put a smile on our faces. All that reminded me that Dylan. was most probably at his best on Highway 61 Revisited because the band on that LP brought out the very best in his rock band fueled songs. The players are a little bit tighter than the Bringing it All Back Home and Blonde on Blonde boys. Nashville Skyline? Not great, but certainly nothing to put me in a foul mood like Costello's Goodbye Cruel World. " I Threw It All Away" is an absolute winner. Just thinking about the song gets me breaking out in goosebumps. I more or less skipped the rest of the catalog. I reached for "Blood on the Tracks." Money well spent. Saved cash was then spent on lots of great Dylan boots that reaffirmed his genius: "Who Killed Davy Moore?", "If You Gotta Go, Go Now", "Can You Please Crawl out Your Window?" (the slower version, with that Highway 61 band, featuring that killer honky tonk piano player), "Nowadays", "John Brown"...what decision maker unwisely decided that these tracks weren't good enough for the released LPs? Whatever the case, the archaeological dig always adds major points, especially when good stuff is turned up over and over again. And that's the key here. As far as the unleashed trove was concerned, his is far greater and more rewarding than any other major player, including that of the Beatles (the Beatles will always be #1 in my book, but besides "I'm Looking Through You #2", "That Means a Lot", and "How Do You Do It", there's nothing there like any one of those previously mentioned Dylan jaw droppers. Glad to see everyone up here once again! E. Pluribus
al on This Is Us
Geo pointed out to me a WFMU show from the other night which played "Murder Most Foul" over and over interspersed with chimps chattering. https://www.wfmu.org/playlists/shows/92415. One of the comments on the song: "The Jim Steinman version of this song would be even more epic and a little more coherent". Get this guy on RTH!
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on Saturday Night (and Every Night and Day) Shut-In: A Relief Plan
Happiness Stan, great idea! I'll set something up when I'm back on my laptop, later tonight or tomorrow.
saturnisminesaturnismine on Disappointing
Basically, I agree with mikey. There are some songs there that I truly love. But a rising tide doesn't lift all boats for me in this case. BigSteve, I hear ya where it comes to Dylan antagonizing his audience comes into play here. I have a slight variation on your idea. I think he was sincere about the direction he took on Nashville. I think he got into deliberately disappointing his audiences after the response to Nashville.
Happiness StanHappiness Stan on This Is Us
Before we get much older I'd like to write an appreciation of Neil Innes, who I met twice and whose passing at the end of last year I felt quite deeply. Mainly I'd like to catch up with old friends, walking back in here last night felt like being home after too long away.
Happiness StanHappiness Stan on 5 Things I Realized From Watching the ZZ Top Documentary on Netflix
That's so cool, Funoka, I've met quite a lot of famous types over the last decade what with one thing and another and it's so refreshing when they turn out to be not only lovely people, but even nicer than you were expecting.
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on 5 Things I Realized From Watching the ZZ Top Documentary on Netflix
Great story, Funoka!
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on Disappointing
For the record, the last thing I was trying to do by posting the article mikeydread passed along was to raise an argument. I thought the piece's measured angle on its meh-ness would lead to people nodding their heads and raising their glass of brandy in humble admiration. It has been nice thinking about those two greatest hits album's again, which were also my way into Dylan. I first heard them on 8-track in my uncle's room. I was shocked when "Watching the River Flow" came on. In my little kid mind, that was my uncle's song, something he frequently played at the piano.
funokafunoka on 5 Things I Realized From Watching the ZZ Top Documentary on Netflix
Haven't seen it yet -- but I have a quick personal Billy Gibbons story. A buddy of mine knows him and we got invited back to his bus after a Wolf Trap show (Vienna, VA) a few years ago. I live five minutes away, so I went, but I am no ZZ Top fan. I did enjoy the hits filled 90-minute show and the people watching. The three ZZ Top dudes all travel on their own ultra luxury bus and seem to have their own support staff. I was blown away by these three big buses in the incredibly large staging area behind the Wolf Trap Filene Center. So we go back to Billy's bus, which I think will be a five minute how'ya doin' type of deal. We were there for 90 minutes -- he poured us some wine, played us some stuff he was working on, gave us all types of swag, including a CD boxed set of all their albums (which I sent unopened to a real ZZ Top fan I know). When it was time to get the show on the road, his assistant had to break up the party. It's true, Billy is surprisingly super skinny. I will never say a bad word about ZZ Top ever again.
funokafunoka on Rock Loses One of Our Own to Pandemic
Hi all -- Been on a crazy Fountains of Wayne jag last few days -- after day two my 12 year-old says "they had some good songs." My brother turned me on to Apartment Life right after it came out when he was living in NYC. Hadn't listened to it years.
funokafunoka on Saturday Night (and Every Night and Day) Shut-In: A Relief Plan
Hello Old Friend(s) -- Let's Go!
BigSteveBigSteve on Disappointing
One aspect of the 'was it disappointing?' question is that Dylan seems to have been actually trying to disappoint his fans, to shake off people who thought he was some kind of prophet or something. This is even truer of Self Portrait, but it goes for everything until he decided to step up again with Blood on the Tracks.
al on Disappointing
RTH is back and so are the hatas! 😏 I can accept a lot of criticisms of this disc - I acknowledged that is isn't Highway 61 Revisited and that my opinion was colored by it being my first love - but it's too short?!?! Really!?!?
Happiness StanHappiness Stan on Saturday Night (and Every Night and Day) Shut-In: A Relief Plan
Hey Mr Mod, how about a rolling thread for artists playing live sets on social media during the lockdown? John Otway played a set last Saturday on Facebook and is doing it again tonight, 8pm UK time, something else over in the us of a. Last night the Smoke Fairies played in their living room for an hour, it was rather lovely and is on FBs version of listen again. There's a great anecdote involving home made soup about three quarters of the way in. Any others coming up?
Happiness StanHappiness Stan on 5 Things I Realized From Watching the ZZ Top Documentary on Netflix
I've never got around to listening to ZZ Top, I'll see if I can find the film and check it out. Have been trying to be more broadminded about stuff I used to be a bit sniffy about, recently watched the Rush documentary on our daughter's boyfriend's Netflix account she signed us into last year before she went off to drama school. Quite enjoyed it, although I don't think I'll be listening to them again for pleasure some time yet. Also rewatched the Artist Formerly Known as Captain Beefheart, and the Wonderful and Frightening World of Mark E Smith, which isn't likely to convert many townspeople to the Fall, but is a riveting watch and confirmed my suspicions that choosing not to meet him on the many occasions I had the chance to do so was probably the right call. Both on YouTube. Any other bonkers documentaries out there to help tide us through?
saturnisminesaturnismine on Disappointing
Oh...and I fall somewhere between Meh and Great with this, but closer to Meh. And Geo, I totally get the notion of Harding as the disappointment threshold. I considered moving my "pulling of the mantle" comments back to that album. But it still feels like it has those trappings in those folk tunes that have a moral to them, or Dear Landlord, which sounds like a personal-to-political extrapolation in a class-ist / Marxist sense. Nashville sees him removing the voice-of-a-generation mantle once and for all, with consistency. It's part of the reason I like it, I suppose. He seems to be enjoying himself, even if I don't enjoy every outing on it.
saturnisminesaturnismine on Disappointing
It's a needle skipper for sure. I always felt better about the idea of Nashville Skyline than the experience of actually listening to it. But when the wife and I are eating breakfast and we need something unobtrusive that sounds like the syrup we're putting on our pancakes, and we're tired of Harvest or the Gilded Palace of Sin, we do occasionally reach for Nasville Skyline. Tonight, I'll be Staying Here with You will always have a special place in my heart. And I always appreciated the ambling, but heartfelt reading of North Country by Mssrs. Dylan and Cash. I unknowingly cribbed more of One More Night's melody than I care to admit for one of my own songs, so I guess it was more deeply embedded in my musical DNA than I ever realized before I did that. Was it disappointing? I don't know how it could be, but I do get the complaint; by mere dint of it's being by Dylan, in 1969 no less, it's *supposed to be great.* And alas, it aint. But I think by the time I had received it, I had no concept of it as a "must have" that would have subsequently let me down upon first playing it. Its reputation had waxed and waned several times by the time I got around to it. Everyone has a different opinion of it. There's no unanimity on its greatness. So I never regarded it as something that would blow my mind the way Bringin' it All Back Home did. To me, it just sounded like the part of Dylan's career where he realized he had the right to explore the musical idioms he loved; that his obligation was no longer to be the voice of a generation. Nashville sees him pulling off that mantle somewhat awkwardly (weird voice, cliche'd lyrics, the over-ripened return to an earlier staple with a country-a-billy stalwart in tow). But I don't blame him for finally shedding it. He had wanted to for years.
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on 5 Things I Realized From Watching the ZZ Top Documentary on Netflix
OK, I think this behind-the-scenes look at "Doubleback" and it's crucial role in BTTF III answers some of your questions, alexmagic. https://youtu.be/AyKZhl9AxBQ There is no dropoff in quality from '80s ZZ Top. As Bob Dylan once predicted about his own musical trajectory, "When you ain't got nothing, you've got nothing to lose." I do think that Zemeckis underused Top in his film. Christopher Lloyd's character was getting stale by this point in the series. For the Old West flashback scenes, the members of ZZ Top should have taken over the role of Michael J Fox's time-traveling Captain Trips. Imagine how cool it would have been if the camera kept panning to Billy, Dusty, and Frank as they stood in line and did that little hand wave gesture, sending Fox off to his next adventure. Seriously, a couple of weeks ago my wife asked me, as we revisited the 1995 flick Outbreak via Netflix Party with E Pluribus Gergely and his better half, why I love seeing a monkey show up in a movie. I told her, "They're like dimestore humans. They're a commentary on our limitations." My issue with 1980s ZZ Top is that they're like dimestore monkeys.
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on 5 Things I Realized From Watching the ZZ Top Documentary on Netflix
John Milius was the director, geo. Alexmagic, I'm beginning to research my response to your query. So far, I've got this to share: https://youtu.be/MfobYtIgkuA
Happiness StanHappiness Stan on Disappointing
As a confirmed Bob-ophile, albeit in an alternate universe where Street Legal was his last album, or Infidels if I was feeling charitable, I'd agree with "meh", but probably only because it was the first "meh" album since the first, which was obviously years before Like a Rolling Stone was the yardstick for everything else to be measured against. At the risk of turning all the townsfolk agin me before I've even said anything half as controversial as I used to, I'd make an exception for Christmas in the Heart, which I'm able to enjoy in a non-ironic way, along with Tiny Tim's Christmas Album, both of which capture the spirit of the season in a way that bloody Waitresses song and that horrible dirge by the Pretenders fail dismally at. If JWH sounds like he's treading water, at least you're listening to an Olympic swimmer doing it. Nashville Skyline was a pointer to where he was heading with the next three albums and those of us who love him and wish him well are still in denial about it. If it was on I wouldn't switch it off. I was parked up in the car the other day when I heard about Murder Most Foul and put it on to listen to when I drove off. I got to four minutes fifty, but only because I couldn't find anywhere to stop from about the three minute mark. Don't know if any of you are familiar with the works of the poet William McGonagall, but by the second verse I was expecting him to start rambling about the beautiful bridge over the silvery Tay. Perhaps someone who's got all the way through might let me know if he does? I want expecting greatness, but so wanted it to be good. So, on a scale from Highway 61 to Murder Most Foul, I'd say it was Infidels. I'd rather listen to it twice than the first two verses of MMF, but then I'd rather listen to "Dylan" than inflict that on myself again.
geo on 5 Things I Realized From Watching the ZZ Top Documentary on Netflix
Red Dawn was directed by John Milius, right? Do you think he studied film under Riefenstahl? In the immortal words of somebody..."What are you, vaping these days?"
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on 5 Things I Realized From Watching the ZZ Top Documentary on Netflix
To geo: Thank our maker(s)! To the magic man, I'm going to have to do some research. I just got done watching 1984's Red Dawn, which had less evidence of a story than there is evidence of the livestock on that Top tour. When my brain resets, I will take some time to track down that scene in the film, which I did see in the theater. I'll also take time to revisit the acting chops of Leah Thompson, which were compromised in Red Dawn, thanks to a studio that was too prudish to leave in a love scene between her character and an older character played by Powers Booth.
geo on 5 Things I Realized From Watching the ZZ Top Documentary on Netflix
This site is peopled by some troubled folks.
alexmagicalexmagic on 5 Things I Realized From Watching the ZZ Top Documentary on Netflix
Mod, enough with this '70s Top vs. '80s Top business. You're stuck in the past, man! Let's get down to business here - and do what needed to be done years ago on this site to appeal to the vital youth market of today - and talk '90s ZZ Top. Please give me your thoughts on their 1990 song "Doubleback" (the theme song from BACK TO THE FUTURE III). Specifically, I am asking you to consider and answer the following: -Was BTTF3's status as a (relative) bust due to the (relative) failure of "Doubleback" as a comeback vehicle for The Top or did "Doubleback" itself directly cause BACK TO THE FUTURE III to underperform on the big screen? ("Doubleback", their first single in four years, hit #1 on the US mainstream rock chart but stalled at #50 on the Billboard 100; similarly, BACK TO THE FUTURE III brought in over $244M at the domestic box office, but that's still almost $100M less than BACK TO THE FUTURE II brought in just a year earlier) -"Doubleback" is the best-performing Top song in the history of the Swiss Hitparade, charting 20 full spots ahead of, say, a "Gimme All Your Lovin". Why do you think "Doubleback" resonated so strongly with the Swiss? -As we all know, "Doubleback" was a featured song in the classic 1990 Data East "Back To The Future: The Pinball" machine. Was Michael J. Fox right to refuse Data East the rights to likeness on the machine? -"Doubleback": better or worse than '80s Top?
2000 Man2000 Man on Disappointing
I think it would aspire to "meh" status. The best thing about it is it doesn't last very long.
geo on Disappointing
One more thing, my entry tune to Television was their version of "Knockin' on Heaven's Door." When I went to see them and Talking Heads in NYC at the recommendation of a friend living up there, I wasn't really feeling it for the first few songs seeming like a slightly unfocused standard rock band. When they did their version of KNOHD, with its epic stops with ringing harmonics hanging in the silences, what they were up to became very compelling. So I have to make that exception for that cover.
geo on Disappointing
I went to High School with Al and came to Dylan right around the same time. The first two albums that I was exposed to were, pretty much simultaneously, "Nashville Skyline" and "Greatest Hits," probably in 1969 when NS came out. I was in 8th grade and one of my older sisters had those albums. I was buying records, including albums since about '67, when Underground radio and The Beatles started to move the dominant musical format from singles to albums. Anyway, I knew Dylan well from his big radio hits, "Rolling Stone," "Positively Fourth Street," and, particularly, "Rainy Day Women." I wasn't disappointed by NS because when I first heard it, I had no specific expectations of a Bob Dylan album, not having really firsthand experience with any of his earlier albums. I will say, however, that is was definitely the Greatest Hits album that sent me on the hunt for the back catalogue and I could very well see myself being disappointed if I had hopped on the train a few stops earlier. Also, to digress, that Greatest Hits album is killer. I just looked at the track listing and it's entirely clear how that could lead to an endless series of subsequent purchases. The non-radio hit stuff was a mix of instantly iconic songs that spoke very clearly, for example "The Times They Are a-Changin", radio hits for other artists with Dylan's unique take, "Tambourine Man" and "It Ain't Me, Babe" and combinations of the two, "Blowin' in the Wind." I have a feeling that if Al replays his Dylan explorations, he'll realize that this album, way more than NS is the key to his obsession. I clearly recall my disappointment when I purchased "John Wesley Harding" and found it didn't include "Memphis Blues Again." From the airplay MBA had gotten on Philadelphia's FM underground, I assumed it wasn't included on GH because it was on the album that came out later.
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on Disappointing
You've made my week, BigSteve, by pointing out the need to block any further airings of "Knocking on Heaven's Door" by anybody. That song's rise to prominence thanks to Guns 'n Roses is regrettable. Even Dylan's version is a trinket that was only worth hearing twice annually.
Happiness StanHappiness Stan on Saturday Night (and Every Night and Day) Shut-In: A Relief Plan
Deep joy! Oh yes. Life has been strange for quite a lot of the last eight years, I've often thought of happy days here at the Hall, how wonderful to see its doors opening again. I've been out of love with music for a while, but over the last couple of years have been back in grooving mode again and even made it to Glastonbury last year. Thanks Mr Mod for inviting us all back again, look forward to checking out what's happening later. Stay cool won't you, if you can't manage that at least all stay safe.
BigSteveBigSteve on Disappointing
I vote meh. I am a huge Bob Dylan fan, but after John Wesley Harding I just took a vacation from him for a while. I liked New Morning, but for me he doesn't get interesting again until Planet Waves. I'm not against him being a country crooner for a while in theory, but there's just not enough A material on this album to keep my interest even now. I've never liked Lay Lady Lay. There I said it. I've always liked Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You, but I think I had that song because it was on Greatest Hits Vol. 2. Nowadays I really love I Threw It All Away, but I never really got into it until its appearance on Kojak Variety. I've been acquiring most of the Bootleg Series collections. The one covering the Self Portrait era really showed that there was enough good material for that album to have been better, but for reasons known only to His Bobness the lamer stuff ended up on the album. The newest Bootleg Series volume that covers the Nashville Skyline era got a big pass from me. I'm just not interested. The best thing you can say about Nashville Skyline is that it's not as bad as Pat Garrett & Billy the Kid. Speaking of which I never want to hear anyone sing Knocking on Heaven's Door EVER AGAIN.
diskojoediskojoe on Disappointing
Nashville Skyline has a bunch of great songs that I like, including "Lay, Lady, Lay", "I Threw It All Away", "Tonight I'll Be Staying Here With You" & the duet w/Johnny Cash. However, it's a short album, only about 29 minutes or so, when all his previous albums were about 50 or so minutes long, which probably explains its "meh" status. As for "George Jackson" , I only first heard it recently when listening to a rebroadcast of Casey Kasem's American Top 40 show from 1971. There's a station in Cape Cod that rebrocast the 70s shows on Saturday AM & the 80s shows on Sunday AM. I love listening to the shows from 1970-1974 from #40 to #30, which has quirky & interesting stuff such as James Brown & other obscure soul & one hit wonders
al on Rock Loses One of Our Own to Pandemic
Not covid, but Bill Withers has died as well. I think I posted back in one of the earlier RTH iteration of having once read that he was unique in that he had no real antecedents musically nor any musical descendants and that strikes me as pretty accurate.
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on Disappointing
For the record, I don't dislike the album, but I play it less than any of his albums considered "good-to-great" from the first phase or two of his career, however one slices it up. I think it's a bit "meh." As some of you may recall, however, I love the John Wesley Harding album, perhaps more than most would consider imaginable.
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on Rock Loses One of Our Own to Pandemic
Funny to see that Lloyd Cole plays on Apartment Life, Oats. I still haven't revisited the album today, but last night I was trying to think of how I remembered it sounding, and I kept coming back to the couple of Lloyd Cole records I know (one's called something like Don't Get Weird On Me, right?). That Bacharach thing comes up on both those records, too. Your ending line, Oats, intended or not, was well played by dusty RTH standards.
al on Disappointing
I can’t be objective about Nashville Skyline as I may be the only Dylan fanatic in the world who came to him though this album. In 1969 I knew of Dylan, knew “Blowin’ In The Wind”, “Times…”, “Like A Rolling Stone”, and such but didn’t have any albums. I borrowed Nashville Skyline from a cousin, immediately loved it, and within a few months had his entire back catalogue, no small accomplishment for a poor 14 year-old, saving up his money from delivering the Philadelphia Bulletin. I think at least one of those LPs still has the shrink-wrap on it with the sticker ($2.98!!) bought at the little record shop/music instrument place on 69th Street in Upper Darby; anyone remember that place or its name (and, no, not Record Museum; it was equidistant from the Tower Theater in the other direction)? And just so you know what you are dealing with, I’ve bought every album since. Hell, I’m waiting delivery of a new Japanese singles collection that I spent $45 on because it has the big band version of George Jackson on it which I don’t think I have on a legitimate CD (I have the original single and I have it on a boot, and maybe it’s even on that Sidetracks disc I have but, you know, this is what I do; not proud of it or anything). How are you going to criticize an album for not being Highway 61 Revisited? Doesn’t pretty much every album ever made (warning: mild hyperbole alert) pale in comparison to that? What I recently wrote to Geo about "Murder Most Foul" applies to Nashville Skyline as well - “I love it. I'm not sure how great a song - although I do think it is great and greater with every listen - it is in the Dylan canon but it surely is amazing. And Dylan, well, he never fails us, does he? Almost 60 years into this and still breaking ground, still innovating, still surprising. And so out of the blue. Why do I keep being surprised by him? In a world that can be turned upside down in the space of a few weeks, Bob Dylan, even as he changes all the time, never standing still, never looking back, is like a rock.” He started doing this with Another Side, then with Highway 61 Revisited, and on through John Wesley Harding, Nashville Skyline, Saved, Shadows In The Night, and now this new one. C’mon, “Lay Lady Lay”, “I Threw It All Away”, “Tell Me That It Isn’t True”, “Tonight I’ll Be Staying Here With You”? You gotta be the least romantic person in the world to not love this album.
OatsOats on Rock Loses One of Our Own to Pandemic
Hello RTH. Wanted to chime in about Ivy, my favorite of Adam Schlesinger's projects. Yes, Apartment Life is their best album; it was a favorite of mine in college. Dominque Durand is the lead singer; the group is rounded out by Schlesinger and Durnad's husband, Andy Chase. Some of the guests on Apartment Life include Lloyd Cole, Dean Wareham, and Stan Demeski of the Feelies. Like Mr. Mod says, it's not power-pop. Jangly, sometimes with synths and drum loops, with occasional Bacharach touches and a general sophisti-pop mood. So yeah, it's very late-'90s, but I think it's one of the best examples of that type of thing that was in the air during that time. I certainly pull Apartment Life out much more frequently than I do my old Ben Folds Five, Rufus Wainwright, and High Llamas albums. Or Painted from Memory, for that matter.
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on Saturday Night (and Every Night and Day) Shut-In: A Relief Plan
I'll have to revisit Faust. Amon Duul II continues to be my favorite band from that period.
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on 5 Things I Realized From Watching the ZZ Top Documentary on Netflix
Good point, mikeydread. MTV-era makeovers to the likes of ZZ Top and J Geils Band did call into question that notion that you can't make a silk purse out of a sow's ear.
mikeydreadmikeydread on Saturday Night (and Every Night and Day) Shut-In: A Relief Plan
Geo, I have the Can Singles collection, which I enjoy greatly, like a big tray of (admittedly weird) assorted chocolates. Will lend an ear to Faust over this period of, ah, well, isolation. Cheers.
geo on Saturday Night (and Every Night and Day) Shut-In: A Relief Plan
mikeydread, If you haven't, make sure that you check out Faust. They don't lean into the classic motorik Krautrock sound like Can and Neu, but they are my very favorite. Also the fairly recent Can Singles collection works better for me than any of their albums with the exception of Future Days.
mikeydreadmikeydread on 5 Things I Realized From Watching the ZZ Top Documentary on Netflix
MTV did very strange things to music, some for better, some worse. Along with the ZZ Top makeover think of the J Geils Band. A stinky blues bar band from Boston somehow made over into chart-chasing pin-ups for the small screen. I have a soft spot for their live album but couldn't imagine putting on the hits. Same with ZZ Top and the early records. As for Prince, well, a rockstar's first and only job requirement is to be noticed, and I always felt the late purple one was forever trying way too hard on that score. Upwards and onwards.
mikeydreadmikeydread on Saturday Night (and Every Night and Day) Shut-In: A Relief Plan
How great to hear that bell ringing out again above Rock Town Hall. Greetings and salutations from Melbourne, Australia. I may be more of a lurker than a poster, but then again, these days who knows what theories might pop into my head? For example, in the time we have been away from each other I seem to have developed a deep fascination for krautrock. I blame Julian Cope and the 1972 debut album by Neu! Look forward to hearing the chatter from RTH over the coming months.
Mr. ModeratorMr. Moderator on Rock Loses One of Our Own to Pandemic
I've got Apartment Life, and DD is the singer. I remember it being a solid album - not power poppy, though. I'll try to give it a spin tomorrow. You should check it out.
ladymisskirroyaleladymisskirroyale on Saturday Night (and Every Night and Day) Shut-In: A Relief Plan
Welcome back, Mr. Mod and RTH! In the last few years, I have come to accept that I don’t like a lot of new music and prefer to endlessly listen to those albums from my younger days. So whenever you all are up for discussion of Mark Kozolek’s oeuvre, I’m your gal. I’m also ready to start reminiscing about those fondly remembered things called live shows, and share stories about running into musicians in the wild. (Paul Weller! Yo La Tengo! I’m still a fan girl.)

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