hrrundivbakshi

hrrundivbakshi

Dec 242015
 

Flunk Punks “Guitar Tech” Paul Shields, with THE INFAMOUS YAMAHA DT 175 IN THE BACKGROUND!

Happy holidays, Rock Town Hall members and hangers-on!

As has become a bit of a tradition ’round these parts, on this festive day of the year, I present you with the annual telling of my greatest moment of rock embarrassment — namely, the story of The Day I Rode My Motorcycle On-stage at School Assembly and Proceeded to Suck Mightily. This year, however…there’s more!

First of all, there are pictures to share, culled from dusty old photo albums–including, as you’ll see above, a picture of the actual motorcycle! I wish I had pictures of all the members of the “band,” but there seem to be just a few in my possession. Perhaps more illuminating, I’ve managed to gather a few recollections of the event from other members of the Flunk Punks! This year, I managed to track down two: David “Bertie” Bertram and Peter Horn. Peter was characteristically taciturn about the whole affair, but Bertie remembered something I’d long since forgotten: the Flunk Punks “groupies!”

Anyway, the story proceeds below, followed by our star witnesses’ commentary. Enjoy, and–best wishes for the season, RTH!

HVB

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Mar 082015
 

… but it’s not. More confirmation in my mind that Paul McCartney has actually gone insane, and a surprise gold star for the Eric Clapton page in my book. Eric’s reactions to PM’s weirdnesses are priceless.

In related news, I recently made myself read May Pang’s memoir of her years with John Lennon (found in a thrift store for a buck or two), and it contained a couple — just a couple, mind you — of nuggets. Number one: evidently, Paul McCartney has the irritating habit, if there’s a musical instrument of any kind in the room, of drifting away from whatever conversation he’s having and sneaking over to play something — anything — whether he’s asked to or not.

Number two: John Lennon’s favorite song in 1978 was… “Reminiscing,” by the Little River Band. Yes, nine years after recording this:

… Lennon was grooving to this:

Not sure what to make of all this.

HVB

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Jan 132015
 

I’m raising the RTH “choose sides” battle flag high with this one. There is no way any self-respecting lover of rock and roll music could possibly prefer Billy Thorpe & the Aztecs’ turgid, plodding, bongwater-soaked “Mama” to The Atlantics and their tight, focused, garage punk colossus “Come On.” I present it to you here. Who’s with me? Should Mod just return to his seat quietly and try to forget this ever happened? Who’s on Team Atlantics?

I mean, come ON. The lead singer’s hair alone wins this one!

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Dec 252014
 

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I had originally intended to solicit new comments from participants in The Greatest Rock Story Ever Told for this holiday season, but, you know, life got in the way. Toddlers.

Anyhow, I didn’t want this day to pass without a gift from me to you of some sort, so I present you with this piece of found Rock art, entitled “Rock and Roll Eruption.” I’m hoping it can spark some discussion. In fact, I’m hoping it will become the new, official Rock Town Hall Theme. It is clearly superior to the current one.

“Rock, I cannot understand you” — truer words have never been spoken.

Yours, etc.,

HVB

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Aug 042014
 

Greetings, all. Sorry for coming back after a long hiatus with a bit of a bummer, but — did any of you guitar-pop fans know that Will Owsley died a few years ago? And that he killed himself? I don’t know why, but this one hurt a little bit more than I expected.

Back in the mid-’90s, townsman Mockcarr and I enjoyed discovering the decade’s few truly good albums and artists in the “power-pop” genre, and our voyage of discovery pointed us in the direction of Owsley’s truly excellent eponymous debut album. In an era that predated any meaningful internet discovery, finding something like it — an album about which one could basically find no additional information — was a real moment, and you couldn’t help but take a kind of music nerd pride in having unearthed it. Owsley, and The Grays, and Jon Brion’s first solo album, and Aimee Mann’s “Whatever” — those were discs that *we* found, and artists that *I* pimped among my fellow fans of meticulously crafted, guitar-centric songwriting.

Now I find out that Owsley is dead, at his own hand. He never recaptured the spirit of his excellent first album again (I believe he had two albums that came out after it), but the fact that it still exists as a shining example of what an obsessive, home-recording, pop songsmith can do when he sets his mind to it, makes me happy. Thanks, Will. You will be missed.

HVB

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Apr 252014
 
Nice!

Nice!

A friend of mine posted this link on a competing, nowhere-near-as-cool-as-RTH social media site, and it got me wondering whether we all agreed on Dave Grohl’s apparent fundamental goodness. I’m not looking for a snark-fest, or a dishing of the dirt, I’m more curious about people’s take on this dude. I have a feeling folks like us want to believe in DG’s character. And maybe there’s nothing wrong with that.

Wish I could say I enjoyed his music. And I mean that literally.

HVB

p.s.: my favorite recent bit of Dave Grohl goodness can be seen here.

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