Unwanted

 Posted by
Feb 072014
 

Pound_pets_002

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Russian fine-art duo Komar and Melamid made a name for themselves as painters of images that are an amalgamation, based on polls of what people look for in a painting.

I came across a musical recording they did in 2008 called “The Most Unwanted Music.” Based on one of their polls, the team made what they call a “scientific attempt to create the most annoying song ever.” They actually pull off quite an interesting opus of undesirable elements.

Can you make it through?

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Nov 112013
 

Hey, gang. Mod’s impertinent commentary about Jimi Hendrix’s late career — and specifically his disdainful dismissal of Jimi’s performance at Woodstock — got me thinking about the original big ‘do at Yasgur’s Farm. A quick search on the web for basic set list information on the event led me to conclude that there was a lot of shit that went down there I had no idea about. CCR? Johnny Winter? Neil Young? Mountain? The Incredible String Band? It got me thinking.

Mainly, it got me thinking: is there a snowball’s chance in hell I would have ever braved the traffic jams, the weather, the stench, and the bad acid to check out this show? And if not: how would the show have to have been edited to get me up there?

Of course, I’m just as eager to understand your opinions on the subject. Have a look at the following set list, and let me know your thoughts.

I look forward to your responses.

HVB

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Sep 112013
 
Self Pooptrait

Self Pooptrait

Younger generations are free to celebrate the landmark anniversary of whatever album blew their mind in their youth, say Beck‘s Odelay (an anniversary party for which even I would attend) or that big Outkast album everyone made a fuss over and probably hasn’t listened to since 3 months after initially purchasing. That’s cool; that’s their music. My generation, however, has officially reached the point of scraping the bottom of the barrel on celebrating “classic” albums by classic artists. I first noticed it late last year, I believe it was, when a special anniversary edition of the final full-length album by The Jam, The Gift, was released. Don’t even diehard Jam fans feel that album is pointless beyond 3 songs? That was a memorial ceremony, not an anniversary celebration.

Recently, things went from bad to weird with the box set special anniversary edition release of Bob Dylan‘s critically lambasted Self Portrait. The new special anniversary edition, packaged as Another Self Portrait, includes digitally remastered alternate takes of the original turd as well as outtakes from the equally dismissed—I’m sorry, “under-appreciated” is the revised critical term—New Morning. If that’s not enough to get you to cough up an anniversary gift, the package throws in some outtakes from The Basement Tapes and Dylan’s personal collection of tasteful nude Polaroid shots of Edie Sedgwick. I think I’ll wait for the special anniversary edition of Infidels.

Where do you draw the line on buying a special anniversary edition release from one of your favorite artists?

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Aug 022013
 
60 to SUCK?

60 to SUCK?

It’s cool to consider bands that went from “0 to 60,” such as one of my favorites, The Undertones, who stormed out of the gates with a masterpiece debut as greasy teenagers. I would argue they maintained their lead-footed approach and added some sophisticated off-road maneuvers as they slowed down only slightly to enjoy the sights over their next 2 albums before finally running out of gas on their final album with the original lineup, The Sin of Pride. Our old friend Berlyant might disagree, but that dog’s had its day.

This morning I was listening to an album by a newer band, Alabama Shakes. I really dig their 2012 debut, but every time I listen to it I get a nagging feeling that their next album is going to SUCK. Not only do I fear a sophomore slump, I fear they will forever travel down the road of suck, in short time collaborating with over-the-hill artists looking for a shot of new blood.

I’m now trying to think of bands that, for me, quickly went from 0 to 60, then just as quickly 60 to SUCK. As an example, although I was never sold on the genius of the debut album by The Strokes, it was pretty cool and catchy. By all accounts, real fans of the band’s debut were sorely disappointed by the follow-up album and it seems like it’s been all downhill since then.

Is there a band that fits this profile for you?

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Sep 242012
 

Don't show me no more, please.

I never walked in on my parents having sex, but for those who have I understand the experience fell under the category of Stuff I Wish I’d Never Seen. I never watched a “snuff” film or saw Bud Dwyer, that disgraced Pennsylvania politician from the ’80s, pull the trigger on himself at a live televised press conference, but I would think those experiences would have also fallen into that category.

Every once in a while I’m surfing YouTube and I come across something I think looks interesting, like Joe Strummer covering “Walk on the Wild Side.” I excitedly hit PLAY, then I think, Man, this falls under stuff I wish I’d never seen.

Just now I came across a clip that I knew had to be bad, but considering how much I love The Temptations, I wish I’d never seen it…after the jump.

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May 312012
 

Innovators of Suck

In a recent thread I actually found myself defending Dave Matthews Band, within the context of the topic at hand, for “sucking in an original way.” Townsman cherguevarra picked up on this and wondered:

Who are rock’s greatest innovators when it comes to originality in sucking, since often one major component of sucking is being too derivative of other artists?

Isn’t it time we identify and pay homage to rock’s greatest innovators in sucking?

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