chickenfrank

Jul 012020
 

Nine things I like. Do you have a tenth?

  1. The song rocks.
  2. It took all of 3 notes out of the bass to get all the bald heads bouncing and swaying in recognition.
  3. The matching stage wear of the band. All agreed; no shirts. We’re  going for the escaped prison camp look. That’s some real dedication to a uniform look.   
  4. Guy Picciotto, the hardcore hype man I find so entertaining to watch. He’s getting a lot work in for very little asked of him. 
  5. The melding of band and audience. There are so many people next to them, behind them, and even over them. Everyone is giving the band enough room, and no one is tossing kids off speakers.
  6. At the 00:55 mark when it’s the sing-along I Wait, I Wait; from behind, the one hardcore guy puts his arm around the other hardcore guy and they look like they are singing along to a sea chanty. It’s sweet.
  7. Camera sweep over the audience, and you see how chill it is for a “hardcore” show.
  8. You can really hear the audience singing at the end of the song before a tight ending.
  9. It’s a joyous performance.
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Jun 182020
 

You’re sent to the proverbial deserted island, except on this lousy island, you’re not allowed to bring your 10 favorite albums or artists. There are only four bands’ records available here, and there’s a waiting list. You get to choose from among these four bands: U2, REM, Red Hot Chili Peppers, and Pearl Jam. What order do you put those bands in when you send them to the island quartermaster? Most desired to least desired. I will share my order, but I’m curious about the wisdom and tastes of the Hall.

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Jul 082013
 

216px-Pittsburgh_Pirates_MLB_Logo_svgWhile reading about the surprising success of the 2013 Pittsburgh Pirates, I noticed that the columnist referred to the team with the familiar insider’s nickname of the “Buccos” a few times. That reminded me of how the Montreal Canadiens were sometimes called the “Habs” instead. It’s odd because a team name is a nickname already. Why would you need an insider’s nickname to the nickname?

A band’s name is a nickname too, but sometimes the hippest of the hipsters need to prove their deeper band loyalty by referring to their favorites by their second-level nickname. Are there a lot of these? Ask your friends Whitey and Lumpy for the band nicknames that can only be associated with a single band and must be obviously recognized as that band’s nickname. Easy one: Everyone knows your talking about The Beatles when you say the Fab Four.

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Annoyer!

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Jun 092013
 

stewart_copeland_laMissing friend of the Hall Raggers had a great faux rock band name called Annoyer. His idea was that it was a heavy metal band along the lines of Destroyer. Since it never materialized, I’m going to steal his name and apply it differently.

If you were forming a band comprised of the most annoying personalities in rock and roll, who would get invited? This is not a call for musicians that make annoying music. This is meant to gather the most annoying personalities in rock. You may even like the music they play, but know that their personalities are so objectionable that there would be multiple homicides even before the tour bus pulled out of the parking lot.

A couple of names I’d put on the roster would be Stewart Copeland on drums and Ted Nugent on lead guitar. I’m basing their inclusion on Copeland’s interview on Costello’s Spectacle and on everything I’ve ever seen Nugent say or do. Offer a replacement if you have someone even more annoying than those two. Who else gets the call to fill out the band?

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Sep 172012
 

John, how many songs should George get?

I’m a 2per. So is George Harrison, and so is John Entwistle, and so is Dave Davies. That’s the term I’m slapping on a person in a band with a dominant songwriter who typically gets two of his songs included on each album among the principal songwriter’s songs. When I brought up the concept to E. Pluribus Gergley of RTH discussing who the best 2per is, he responded in his typically open-minded way that there’s nothing to discuss. It’s George Harrison. So I sat on the topic until I thought of a different angle on it.

Continue reading »

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Jul 162012
 

Your headline, please.

Last night Bruce Springsteen invited Paul McCartney to join him on stage for his show’s fantastic finale in Hyde Park in London. Despite the enormity of this musical event, representatives from City Council pulled the plug while Bruce, Paul, and the band were still playing because it was getting too late! It’s like a soundman giving Jesus the  “2 more minutes” sign while he’s delivering the Sermon on the Mount.

What’s the appropriate use of a lyric, album title, etc. to create the Daily Mail’s morning  headline for the story? I’m going with ‘Because the Night’ ends at 10:30. Others?

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Jun 272011
 

Every songwriter hits a dry spell with lyrics. When they do, many that have been writing for awhile go this old trick: they write lyrics about the very song they are singing at that time. They sit there with their instrument and sing about sitting there with their instrument to tell you more about the song they are sitting there singing about. Jane! Get me off this crazy mobius strip! George has one of the better examples in this vein because it’s not just about the song he’s singing, but really a funny reaction to the legal troubles he had when accused of ripping off “He’s So Fine.” Still, it’s a song about the song itself.

OK, LMS: What other songs have a lyric that makes reference to the same song being sung?

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